2021-22 HS Course Guide

2021-22 High School Program Course Selection Guide

Download the program guide as a PDF

Course selection sheets – gr. 10-12

What’s New in 2021-22?

Program guide graphics
Design by Lily Galluccio

Dear Students and Parents:

This is the Scotia-Glenville High School Program Planning Guide for 2021-22. This guide will help you to prepare a program for the next school year. Please read the booklet carefully and make careful choices.

The Guidance Department distributes scheduling material to classes. During these sessions counselors will inform you of course options and other dates necessary in the scheduling process. After the course selection process is completed, the staff will design a master schedule.

We ask that you make course choices to which you are definitely committed. Talk to your parents, teachers, and counselors to help you make sound choices. We hope that your selections will be carefully considered, for no changes or drops are permitted during the first nine weeks of the next school year. However, we know that goals do change and that sometimes alterations must be made. Therefore, when you receive your program schedule in the summer we expect you to study the results and make any changes that you wish during the month of July. Guidance counselors will be available to explain options and provide advice. When school begins in September, you will have a definite schedule for the entire year. Changes are not easily made after the summer and are sometimes impossible to make at all. Please read the course selection form thoroughly regarding the drop/add procedure, including the related grading provision.

Please feel free to talk to any staff member about scheduling. If you or your parents need any special assistance, we will be happy to help in any way we can.

Sincerely,

Peter Bednarek, Principal
Thomas Fyvie, Assistant Principal

Additional student graphic for program guide
Design by Justina Kelone

Note to students and parents: All courses that are listed in the Program Planning Guide that are additional to those that are core to the New York State Graduation Requirements will be offered based on enrollment and budgetary considerations.

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INTRODUCTION

The Scotia-Glenville Central School District hereby advises students, parents, employees and the general public that it offers employment and education opportunities, including vocational education opportunities, without regard to sex, race, color, national origin or handicap. Inquiries regarding this nondiscrimination policy may be directed to the Section 504 coordinator, Andrew Giaquinto, Scotia-Glenville Schools, Scotia, New York, (518) 382-1222.

This Program Planning Guide is prepared to acquaint you with the course offerings, description, and prerequisites of subjects taught at Scotia-Glenville High School. Your guidance counselor is anxious to assist you so that you understand how to select your courses to meet your particular career/college goals.

You are asked to proceed as follows in selecting your courses:

  • Review the Program Planning Guide with particular attention to graduation requirements.
  • Be sure to visit your guidance counselor to help with your decisions.
  • Study the course offerings. After you consider the courses you have already taken, circle the courses you wish to take on the Course Selection Sheet. A graduation requirement checklist is provided.
  • Meet with your current teachers to learn more about the particular subject you have selected and obtain their endorsement on your selection sheet. Or see teachers in the department you may wish to take a course in.
  • Discuss your program with your parents, obtain their signature, sign the form yourself and return it to your homeroom teacher. PAY PARTICULAR ATTENTION TO DEADLINE DATES.

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PROGRAM CHOICE

In choosing your courses be sure that you will qualify for graduation. To qualify for a diploma you must earn a certain amount of credits, complete specific courses and pass certain regents tests. A credit is earned by successfully passing a course which meets for 40 weeks. Half credits and quarter credits are awarded for courses meeting for proportionate amounts of time. The basic requirements are summarized on page 7. Availability of all *NEW OFFERINGS are subject to budget decisions made by the Board of Education.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION

A student may earn a maximum of 6 1/2 credits for either a regents or a local diploma through credit-by-exam, a procedure set forth by the New York State Education Department. A student who believes he or she will benefit academically by exercising this option in a particular course must develop an alternative plan for meeting the course requirements and must score at or above 85% on an approved regents or final exam. Interested students should see either their counselors or the appropriate department chairperson for details. Applications must be submitted to the principal for approval.

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SCHEDULING

Planning your program should follow certain guidelines. Some of these should be the result of your own ideas about yourself and your future. Others are the result of school policies and practices. These latter guidelines are summarized below:

  1. Each student must be scheduled for at least 6 credits including physical education. In grades 11 and 12 a student may schedule as few as four subjects if such students have permission for early release for employment and providing all graduation requirements are met.
  2. Each senior must be scheduled for one credit in English and one credit in Social Studies and a PE class each semester. CAREFULLY CHECK YOUR SCHEDULE DURING THE SUMMER FOR THIS.
  3. Doubling up in a subject area, such as, taking two math courses the same year, is generally not allowed. Students with extremely unusual circumstances should see their guidance counselor as soon possible.
  4. Course Drops are generally not allowed once school starts until the 9th week of the course and a grade has been assigned. Students are therefore reminded to select courses carefully.
  5. No drops can take place after 50% of the course is completed.

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HOMEROOMS

Students will be assigned to sophomore, junior and senior homerooms on the basis of the number of credits earned:

  • Sophomore – 5 1/2 Credits
  • Junior – 11 Credits

Candidates for graduation will be assigned to senior homerooms if successful completion of their schedules would permit them to earn enough credit to graduate.

GUIDANCE SERVICES

The objectives of the Secondary Guidance Program are to assist students with the setting of educational and career goals that aid students in becoming responsible adults. The Secondary Guidance Department has developed a number of strategies to meet these objectives:

1. Academic Planning
a. Conduct an annual review of each student’s educational progress and career plans.
b. Assist students in making decisions regarding course and sequence selection.
c. For students who are at risk for course failure, the guidance staff works in conjunction with classroom teachers in making recommendations for improving study skills and classroom performance.

2. Career & Life Planning
a. Discuss and track career/post-graduate plans.
b. Complete online Interest Inventory.

3. Academic Advising and Support
a. Conduct individual and group conferences with parents, students and teachers.
b. Assist students in the areas of personal growth and development.
c. Make referrals to other pupil personnel members, community, state or federal agencies.
d. Help teachers enhance the learning opportunities for students.

4. Administrative
a. Assist Administration with the master schedule.
b. Maintain the computerized grade reporting system.
c. Print and distribute report cards.
d. Participate in committees beyond the scope of the guidance office.
e. Lend assistance to the administration and faculty in the day-to-day operation of the school.

Mrs. Lise Williams, Counselor
Ms. Denise Caruso, Counselor
Ms. Jessica Balch, Counselor
Mr. David Langdon, Counselor

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COURSE AND TESTING REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

Advanced Regents Diploma

Course Requirements

Students must earn the following course credits in order to graduate with an Advanced Regents Diploma:

English, 4
Social Studies, 4
Math, 3
Science, 3
World Languages (WL), 3
Fine Arts, 1
Health, 0.5
Physical Education, 2
Electives, 1.5
Total Credits – 22

Testing Required for Graduation: Advanced Regents Diploma

Students must demonstrate competency in reading, writing, math, science, U.S. History and global studies by passing the New York State Regents Exams listed below:

  • English Regents
  • Global History & Geography Regents
  • U.S. History & Government Regents
  • Common Core Algebra I, Common Core Geometry and Common Core Algebra II Regents
  • Two Lab Science Regents
  • WL Checkpoint B Exam
  • ** or 5 credits in Technology, Art, Business, Family and Consumer Sciences, or Music

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Regents Diploma

Course Requirements

Students must earn the following course credits in order to graduate with a Regents Diploma:

English, 4
Social Studies, 4
Math, 3
Science, 3
World Languages (WL), 1 (a)
Fine Arts, 1
Health, 0.5
Physical Education, 2
Electives, 3.5
Total Credits – 22

(a)   Students are required to have completed one unit of a world language by the end of their freshman year.

Testing Required for Graduation: Regents diploma

Students must demonstrate competency in reading, writing, math, science, U.S. History and global studies by passing the New York State Regents Exams listed below:

  • English Regents
  • Global History & Geography Regents
  • U.S. History & Government Regents
  • Common Core Algebra I Regents
  • One Lab Science Regents
  • WL Checkpoint A Exam

An integrated course in Mathematics/Science/Technology may be used as the third required unit of credit in Mathematics or Science.

**Students acquiring 5 units in one of the following may be exempt from the three credit World Languages (WL) requirement: Art, Music, Business, Technology, Family & Consumer Sciences or Career and Technical Education for an Advanced Regents Diploma. Specific courses may be needed to fulfill this requirement. Please see your guidance counselor.

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Is it possible to get a Regents or Advanced Regents diploma and go to VOTEC?

Yes

If I have passed a Regents Exam, may I retake the Regents to improve my grade?

Yes, if taken by the following January. If you score higher on the exam we will recalculate the final course grade based on the higher score. (Both scores will appear on the transcript.)

Are there a minimum number of credits that a student must be enrolled?

Each student is required to take 6 units of credits including physical education.

What about 5th year senior status?

A 5th year student is a student who has completed 4 years of high school and needs only certain classes to graduate. This student is allowed to attend school only when he/she has these classes.

What are the World Languages (WL) requirements?

  • **Advanced Regents Diploma: A student needs to take 3 units of the same WL and pass the local WL exam.
  • Regents & Local Diploma: 1 unit of WL.

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Does a student need to take art or music to graduate?

Yes, the Fine Arts requirement may be met in any one of the following ways:

  • Studio Art
  • Band
  • Orchestra
  • Chorus
  • Music in Our Lives
  • Design & Drawing for Production / ITT
  • Fashion, Housing and Design

Who is eligible to go to a Vocational Education program?

Students at Scotia-Glenville are afforded the opportunity to pursue studies at the area technical center. Most programs are two years. Beginning in the junior year, students spend half a day enrolled in academic classes at Scotia-Glenville High School and half a day at the Capital Region BOCES – Career & Tech Center studying a trade. Students must be on track for graduation to be eligible for the program.

What career courses are offered at the Capital Region BOCES – Career & Tech Center?

See Capital Region BOCES – Career & Tech (page 44).

How do students learn about the career programs at the Capital Region BOCES – Career & Tech Center?

Any 10th grade student who wants to visit the centers is given the opportunity to do so during a sophomore visitation day. The guidance counselors will work with the students to makes sure that a vocational program will meet their graduation requirements and career expectations.

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Does a student at the Capital Region BOCES – Career & Tech Center have any home school responsibilities?

Yes, students enrolled in a vocational education program must attend classes in the home school and be working toward completing their graduation requirements. Failure to attend and pass core academic classes at the home school will result in the student being placed on probation. If attendance and grades do not improve the student will be removed from the vocation program.

How do students sign up for course requests?

Scheduling material is explained and distributed by the guidance counselors in January and February. Students then enroll in courses in computer labs.

May a class be eliminated due to lack of enrollment?

Yes, if a particular course has a low enrollment, it may be taken off the master schedule, even if it is the only section of that course offered.

How do students make changes to their schedules?

Schedules are sent home the first week of July. Students have until the end of July to make changes.

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GRADING PROCEDURES

When are report cards issued?

Report cards are viewed online. A report card may be mailed home when requested (see school district calendar for specific dates).

What about doubling up on the course for next year?

Doubling of courses will not be allowed in most subject areas.

ACADEMIC HONORS

When are the school’s standards to make the honor roll?

Honor Roll is calculated for all students.

  • Honor Roll: 85%-89.9%
  • High Honor Roll: 90%-100%

How are high achieving seniors recognized?

Scotia-Glenville High School does not recognize a Valedictorian or Salutatorian. In lieu of Valedictorian/Salutatorian, the top performers of the graduate class will be recognized for their achievement. Such recognition takes the form of a cast medal suspended on a crimson and white ribbon.

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NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY

How are National Honor Society members selected?

Students who are interested in being inducted into the National Honor Society should be aware of the criteria for membership:

Selection Qualifications:

Scholarship: 88% Cumulative Average

Leadership

1. Two years of active participation in two (2) clubs, organizations or teams. Clubs, organizations or teams can be school or community sponsored, but at least one must be school sponsored. A maximum of one (1) sports team may be used for qualifications.
2. One elective or voluntary leadership role. This may include, but is not limited to, the organization of a major event, holding a class or club office, or serving as a team captain.
3. A student using a community sponsored component must have an official representative of the community sponsored activity attest to the student’s participation or leadership in that activity.

Service

Participation in volunteer programs or projects while attending high school, (45 hours of service is needed).

Character

Evidence of good attitude, cooperation and ethical standards as determined by the faculty.

Attention Freshmen: It is important to get involved in clubs and service activities during your freshman year! Many students with outstanding academic credentials do not get nominated for the National Honor society because they failed to get involved in the service and leadership roles that are just as important as requirement for admission.

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What steps are required for a student to be considered for membership?

Students who believe that they meet qualifications may pick up resume packets towards the end of the first semester of their Junior year, usually by mid-January, from the faculty adviser. Completed forms must be returned to the NHS Advisor in early February. The resume packet due date will be clearly stated on the form. Induction of new members occurs in April of the student’s Junior year.

SUMMER SCHOOL

What type of summer school does Scotia-Glenville High School run?

The summer school program is for students who fail a course or wish to improve grades they received during the regular school year. Registration for all other courses will be held after report cards are sent at the end of June.

What are the admission requirementS  for attending summer school?

Summer School is offered at the Mohonasen School District. The purpose of summer school is to provide students with the opportunity to “make-up” credits attempted but not earned during the regular school year. An ideal opportunity exists for students to remain on schedule with their graduation class and be promoted despite having failed one or more classes during the regular school year.

Eligibility to enroll in summer school for “repeat courses” is based on:

  • 85% attendance during the school year
  • Minimum grade average of 55%
  • High School Principal approval

The final summer school grade will include a percent of the grade earned during the regular school year. Additional information about summer school can be obtained from the guidance office or the Assistant Principal’s office.

Summer school availability is contingent upon the school budget.

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May I retake a Regents Exam in August without attending summer school?

Yes. If you have passed the course and wish to improve your Regents score, you may retake the regents in August. You must register for the exam by the summer Regents deadline.

Is daily attendance mandatory in summer school?

In order to receive credit for summer school, students must attend class each day. If extenuating circumstances arise, students will be permitted to miss no more than two days of summer school.

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ELECTRONIC ACCESS PRIVILEGES

What specific activities are prohibited by student users of the district computer systems?

In addition to the general requirements of acceptable student behavior expected under the school’s Conduct and Discipline Policy, the following specific activities are prohibited:

  • Using the district computer systems to obtain, view, download, print, display, or otherwise gain access to or to transmit materials that are unlawful, obscene, pornographic, or abusive.
  • Use of obscene or vulgar language in communication with others.
  • Harassing, insulting or attacking others.
  • Damaging, disabling, or otherwise interfering with the operation of computers, computer systems, software or elated equipment through physical action or electronic means.
  • Using unauthorized software on the district computer system.
  • Changing, copying, renaming, deleting, reading, or otherwise accessing files or software not created by the student without express permission from the system administrator.
  • Violating copyright law or employing the district computer system for commercial purposes.
  • Disclosing and individual password to others or using someone’s password.

Are there any special rules for using the Internet or e-Mail?

Yes, follow all the rules dealing with the student use of the district computer system and:

  • Never transmit your address or telephone number.
  • Never transmit bank or credit card information.
  • Never transmit your signature.
  • Never transmit an individual’s picture without written permission.

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2021-22 Program Course Planning Guide

COLLEGE IN THE HIGH SCHOOL COURSES

In partnership with local community colleges and universities, students may earn college credit for classes while in high school (dual-credit). Students can speak with their high school counselor or Michael Parks for more information regarding course options and associated fees of the sponsoring institution. Fees subject to change based on the decision of the institution granting the credit.

Course  Affiliated College Community College/University Course Title  Fee

Business

  • SUPA Accounting  Syracuse University  ACC 151/Financial Accounting  $460 (4 credits)
  • Advertising & Marketing  SCCC  MKT 221/Marketing
    $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)
  • Business Law  SCCC  BUS 121/Business Law I
    $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)
  • Cisco IT Essentials  SCCC  CIS 110-111/Arch Support A+ I-II  $60 per/credit (3 OR 6 CREDITS)
  • Cisco CCNA Discovery  SCCC  CIS 240-241/Internetworking Fundamentals I-II
    $60 per/credit (3 OR 6 CREDITS)
  • Computer Software Applications  SCCC  CIS 121/Intro to Computers  $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)
  • Entrepreneurship  SCCC  MGT 123/Introduction to Business $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)

English

  • AP English Language and Composition  SCCC  ENG 123/College Composition  $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)
  • AP English Literature and Composition  SCCC  ENG 124/Intro to Literature  $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)

Family & Consumer Science

  • Child Growth and Development  SUNY Cobleskill
    ECHD 170/Child Growth and Development Prac  $150 (3 CREDITS)

Fine Arts

  • Drawing & Painting II  SCCC  ART 128/Intro to Drawing
    $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)

Foreign Language

  • College French 1  SCCC  FRE 121/Elem French I  $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)
  • College French 2  SCCC  FRE 122/Elem French II  $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)
  • College German 1  SUNY Oswego  GER 201/Intermediate German  $175 (3 CREDITS)
  • College German 2  SUNY Oswego  GER 202/Continuing Intermediate German  $175 (3 CREDITS)
  • College Spanish 1  SCCC  SPA 202/Inter Spanish I  $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)
  • College Spanish 2  SCCC  SPA 224/Inter Spanish II
    $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)

Math

  • Pre-Calculus  SCCC  MAT 167/Pre Calc/Analyt Geom  $60 per/credit (4 CREDITS)
  • AP Statistics  SCCC  MAT 147/Statistics  $60 per/credit (3 CREDITS)

Science

  • AP Chemistry  SCCC  CHM 121/General Chemistry I (Fall) CHM 122/General Chemistry II (Spring)  $60 per/credit (4 CREDITS per course; Students can earn up to 8 CREDITS)
  • SUPA Physics  Syracuse University  PHY 101-102/Major Concepts of Physics I and II  $920 (8 CREDITS)

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BUSINESS EDUCATION

All business courses may be completed as electives. The following courses may be taken for COLLEGE CREDIT

  • Advertising and Marketing
  • Business Law
  • Business Mathematics
  • CISCO CCNA Discovery Program (Alternate Years)
  • CISCO IT Essentials (Alternate Years)
  • Computer Software Application
  •  Entrepreneurship

Schenectady County Community College grants this credit through Scotia-Glenville High School, and is accepted at the majority of colleges. Students in the high school will be encouraged to complete a minimum of one (1) 1/2 credit course in Business. Courses will be offered in the areas of financial planning, communication and computer technology to help prepare students for the world of work, college and business.

Also available:

  • Career and Financial Management
  • Investment and Financial Decision Making
  • Sports Management
  • SUPA Accounting

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ADVERTISING & MARKETING *

Grades 10-12
Each one 1/2 Credit

How would you like to learn to analyze commercials, conduct market research, design logos, create slogans and jingles, and create radio and television commercials of your own? In these classes we will answer some of the following questions:

  • What makes us choose the products we buy?
  • How does mass media influence our buying decisions?
  • Is advertising truthful and ethical?
  • How do retailers/wholesalers decide what to sell?

Marketing plays a vital role in the successful operation of our global economy from the advertising, market research, distribution, and selling of products to the psychological impact of satisfying the needs and wants of consumers. These courses will take you through all of these areas and will introduce you to and prepare you for careers/college majors in the areas of retail/wholesale business and advertising or related fields. They may be used together in a business sequence or separately as elective credit.

* 10th, 11th & 12th grade students – College credit can be earned.

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BUSINESS LAW *

Grades 10-12
1 Credit

“Justice may be blind,” but you don’t have to be ignorant of the law.
By taking Business Law you can answer many of the legal questions that confront you now and will confront you in the future. Questions like:

  • Do I need a separate auto insurance policy from my parents?
  • What are a minor’s rights under contract?
  • What are my rights if I’m arrested?
  • If my credit card is stolen, how much is my responsibility?
  • Can the school search my locker?

This course is a must for all college bound students, particularly those planning a career in law, accounting, criminal justice, or business as well as anyone just interested in learning about his/her legal rights.

* 10th, 11th & 12th grade students – College credit can be earned.

BUSINESS MATHEMATICS *

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of CC Algebra I and at least one additional math credit.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I Regents Exam.

This course emphasizes the concepts of mathematics as they apply to a wide-range of personal and commercial business problems. The topics covered include how to dissect and solve word problems; fractions, decimals; banking; percents and their applications; trade and cash discounts; payroll; simple interest; compound interest and present value; installment buying; depreciation; and inventory and overhead.

* 11th & 12th grade students – College credit can be earned.
– Can be used toward a 3rd year math credit.

CAREER AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Do you have a plan for your future? Do you know the skills you need to be successful in the workplace? Career and Financial Management will teach you about the business and economic system in relation to your future role as an entrepreneur, employee, consumer and citizen. Career planning and lifelong goals are critical to your success. You will research careers, assess your personal abilities, learn the competencies necessary for success in the workplace, as well as develop job search strategies and resumes. You will learn the newest interview techniques and develop strategies to make an effective transition from education to career. How will you manage your finances? Learn financial skills such as budgeting, management savings and checking accounts, the use of credit cards, computing your income tax and obtaining insurance. In addition, the student has an opportunity to earn a Certificate of Employability.

This course is strongly recommended for all students.

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CISCO CCNA DISCOVERY PROGRAM *

►►► OFFERED 2022-23

Grades 10-12
1 Credit

Class size limited to 14 students.

The Cisco CCNA Discovery Program is designed for students who are seeking entry-level information and communication technology (ICT) skills. In this course, students will use hands-on lab projects that teach networking skills from home computer to small businesses to more complex enterprise models. Students will use powerful simulation programs from the Cisco Academy that allow them to experiment with network behavior and ask “what if” questions. Students will learn the technical skills need to succeed in entry level networking professions such as network installer, help desk technician, pre-sales support technician, or network technician. CCNA Discovery provides an introduction to advanced technologies such as voice, video, wireless, and security.

CCNA Discovery helps prepare students for entry level career opportunities, continuing education and globally-recognized Cisco CCENT and CCNA certifications.

* 10th, 11th & 12th grade students – College credit can be earned.

CISCO IT ESSENTIALS: PC HARDWARE & SOFTWARE *

Grades 10-12
1 Credit

IT Essentials: PC Hardware and Software is an excellent introduction to Information Technology that includes and overview of IT, introduction to networking, PC maintenance, safety and troubleshooting. IT Essentials is recommended as the first course for entry in the IT field.

Students learn the functionality of hardware and software components was well as suggested best practices in maintenance, and safety issues. Through hands-on activities and labs, students learn how to assemble and configure a computer, install operating systems and software, and troubleshoot hardware and software problems.

The IT Essentials course will help prepare you for a career path towards the following occupations: hardware installation coordinator and PC system support. For higher education bound students, this course provides a good foundation to help you enter into computer science and management information systems degree programs.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will receive official Networking Academy Certificate of Completion. IT Essentials prepares students for the Comp TIA A+ certification exam.

* 10th, 11th & 12th grade students – 3 or 6 college credits can be earned.

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COMPUTER SOFTWARE APPLICATION *

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

The Microsoft Office Suite is the most widely used application software on the market today. Do you want to develop professional college presentations using MS WORD and MS POWERPOINT that will make you stand out from everyone else? Are you eager to impress your teachers and future employers with your ability to utilize EXCEL, including the advanced features of macros, functions and PivorTables? Increasing your typing speed is a benefit of this course.

This hands-on course builds an excellent foundation for you whether you are preparing for college or employment.

* 9th, 10th, 11th & 12th grade students – College credit can be earned.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP *

Grades 10-12
1 Credit

Do you dream of starting and running your own business? Have you always wanted to be your own boss? Do you have a product or service idea you would like to make a reality someday? This course will help you learn about entrepreneurship and small business management as well as evaluate your potential to become a success in business.

Throughout the year, you will develop a business plan relating to your “dream business.” Concepts such as feasibility analysis and business planning, market analysis, pricing and promotional strategies, financial management and growing your business will be covered and applied to your business.

This course is recommended for any student planning to start their own business or planning to continue their post-secondary education in a business related field. It may be used to fill a business sequence or taken as an elective.

* 10th, 11th & 12th grade students – College credit can be earned.

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INVESTMENTS AND FINANCIAL DECISION MAKING

Grades 10-12
1/2 Credit

This course is created to (1) educate high school students about sound money management skills and the financial planning process, and (2) help teens to begin to develop positive behaviors that are necessary to attaining financial maturity and achieving a secure future. It is essential in our fast-moving society to have a working knowledge of the fundamentals of basic financial planning and money management. Today’s teenagers, more than any previous generation, will be required to take more personal responsibility for actively managing their finances throughout their lives. The corporate pension plans and generous employee benefits enjoyed by many of their parents are not likely to continue at their current levels, and some plans and benefits may disappear altogether. Already, saving for long-term goals such as retirement is increasingly becoming an individual responsibility, so the need for financial education is high. Individuals who understand financial planning concepts and investment principles will have a significant advantage over those who do not.

SPORTS MANAGEMENT

Grades 10-12
1/2 Credit

Sports/special event management constitutes a rapid growing career specialty. The current sports industry needs highly trained professionals to meet the challenging pace of sport marketing, economics and lifestyle that will surely define growth patterns in tomorrow’s marketplace. The aim of this course is to provide preparation for management or leadership positions in:

  • Amateur athletics organizations
  • Corporate fitness and wellness
  • Private health clubs
  • Professional sports teams/leagues
  • Special event management
  • Sports and communications firms
  • Sports facility management
  • Sports marketing

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SUPA INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING *

Grades 11-12
1 Credit

Syracuse University Project Advance – 4 College Credits

Prerequisite: Students should have an average grade of B or better in high school math courses and be recommended by their high school math or business instructor.

This course introduces students to financial accounting concepts that aid entrepreneurs, manager, and investors in planning, operating, and analyzing a business. Through its emphasis on interpreting financial statements, this class provides a foundation for managing a business as well as for making personal investment decisions. Students are required to complete a comprehensive project that demonstrates their ability to analyze the financial statements of publicly traded companies and make an informed investment decision based on the analysis. This is a college course offered through Syracuse University, and students paying the (discounted) fee for SU credit will receive a Syracuse University transcript.

ENGLISH

► English 9

► English 9-H

► English 10

► English 10-H

► English 11

► English 11 AP

► Senior English Courses

► Special Programs

Regents Level English Courses

The English classes are designed to meet the New York State Learning Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Students in these courses develop communication skills for college and career readiness through a broad range of language arts activities.

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The Honors and Advanced Placement (AP) English Courses

The honors level courses challenge students to exceed the New York State Learning Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Successful honors students effectively express higher level critical thinking skills through their written and oral communication. These students demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of literature and informational texts. Honors and AP students demonstrate academic responsibility and are highly motivated to advance their English skills. Students must receive teacher recommendations for these courses and must complete summer assignments prior to the start of the course in September.

ENGLISH 9

Grade 9
1 Credit

English 9 Regents is aligned to the New York State Learning Standards and prepares students to take the English Regents Exam at the end of their junior year. Students receive instruction in reading and the writing process through the study of a range of literature, including short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction and informational passages. The curriculum builds students’ grammar and vocabulary skills through direct instruction and a constant exposure to challenging terminology. A sequential set of reading, writing, listening and speaking objectives provides overall unity to English 9 and ultimately prepares students for the English Regents in eleventh grade. Students are required to complete a research paper and take a final exam in June. The final exam grade counts as one-fifth of the overall course grade.

ENGLISH 9-H

Grade 9
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Standardized test scores, teacher recommendation, demonstration of above average reading comprehension and writing skills through completion of English 8 with a grade of 90% or better, exemplary work ethic, and the ability to work independently.

English 9 Honors is aligned to the New York State Learning Standards and prepares students to take the English Regents Exam at the end of their junior year. The course is designed for grade 9 students who have demonstrated superior abilities in all areas of English Language Arts. The purpose of the course is to challenge students’ intellect, increase the range of their literary skills through advanced reading and intensive writing instruction. Students will be prepared to take AP Language and Composition in grade 11 and AP Literature in grade 12. Students are expected to sit for the Advanced Placement exams in grades 11 and 12. Students are required to complete a research paper and take a final exam in June. The final exam grade counts as one-fifth of the overall course grade.

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ENGLISH 10

Grade 10
1 Credit

English 10 is aligned to the New York State Learning Standards and prepares students to take the English Regents Exam at the end of their junior year. The course builds on many of the skills and activities initiated in English 9. This course includes readings in fiction and nonfiction, and specific instruction in persuasive, expository, literary and narrative writing. In addition, instruction is given in vocabulary, conventions of standard written English, oral expression, and research skills. Students are required to complete a research paper and take a final exam in June. The final exam grades counts as one-fifth of the overall course grade.

ENGLISH 10-H

Grade 10
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation, demonstration of above average reading comprehension and writing skills through completion of English 9 with a grade of 90% or better, exemplary work ethic, and ability to work independently.

English 10 Honors is aligned to the New York State Learning Standards and prepares students to take the English Regents Exam at the end of their junior year. The Course is designed for grade 10 students who have demonstrated superior abilities in all areas of English Language Arts. The purpose of the course is to challenge students’ intellects and increase the range of their literary skills through advanced reading and intensive writing instruction. Students will be prepared to take AP Language and Composition in grade 11 and AP Literature in grade 12. Students are expected to sit for the Advanced Placement exams in grades 11 and 12. Students are required to complete a research paper. Students will take a final exam in June which counts as one-fifth of the overall course grade.

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ENGLISH 11

Grade 11
1 Credit

English 11 is aligned to the New York State Learning Standards and prepares students to take the English Regents Exam in June. The course builds on the sills and activities initiated in English 10, with a special focus on the core competencies: reading closely, making evidence-based claims about an issue/topic, making evidence-based claims about literature and literary techniques, researching to deepen understanding, and writing from sources. Students will write routinely over both short and extended time frames for a range of tasks, purposes and audiences. Students will take the English Regents Exam in June and it will count one-fifth of the overall course grade.

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSTION

Grade 11 (Full Year)
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation, demonstration of above average reading comprehension and writing skills through completion of English 10 with a grade of 90% or better, exemplary work ethic, and ability to work independently.

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition is a course for highly motivated students who, in their junior year, want to take a college-level English course. All students in the course take the AP English Language and Composition Exam in May. Depending on their score students may receive advanced placement credit when they enter college. This course is the equivalent of a college freshman composition class with an emphasis on rhetorical analysis and argumentative writing. The demands of AP Language and Composition are high and this is considered a challenging course. Students who wish to sign up must be competent and highly motivated. As juniors, they are also required to take the English Regents Exam in June as part of their graduation requirement.

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Senior English Courses

In order to meet graduation requirements, a student must successfully complete one credit of English in 12th grade. Students may earn additional credit by selecting courses beyond the one credit requirement. The availability of the following courses depends on student preferences, scheduling conflicts and budgetary constraints. Students are not guaranteed their preferred courses.

Each Senior English Course will require:

  • College or personal essay
  • College/Career writing skills
  • Group work and oral presentations
  • Full-length research paper

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

Grade 12 (Full Year)
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation, demonstration of above average reading comprehension and writing skills through completion of English 11 with a grade of 90% or better, exemplary work ethic, and ability to work independently.

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition is a course for highly motivated students who, in their senior year, want to take a college-level English course. All students in the course take the AP English Literature and Composition Exam in May. Depending on their score students may apply for advanced placement when they enter college. This course is the equivalent of a college freshman literature class with emphasis on advanced writing skills. The demands of AP Literature and Composition are very high. Students who wish to sign up must be competent and highly motivated.

CAREER & MEDIA LITERACY

Grade 12
20 weeks 1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: English 11

This course is designed to enable students to recognize the power and importance of media analysis and to explore career options. Students will learn to think critically abut what they read, watch, and hear through the study of the major forms of mass media. Readings will include a variety of short and longer texts, both fiction and nonfiction, that explore the impact of media on our lives and allow students to critique the effects various media have on American culture and society. In addition, students will have the opportunity for a self-directed career investigation. Assignments will include analysis of the social and psychological impacts of media consumption through essays, oral presentations, and creative projects. The course will culminate in a research paper where students will have the option to write about either the role of media in our world, or a controversial issue in a career field of their choice.

COLLEGE COMPOSITION*

20 weeks
1/2 Credit

This course provides a foundation for college-level academic discourse by developing effective communication skills with an emphasis on expository writing and rhetoric. In addition to the college application essay, a research paper and an oral presentation are required assignments. This course is best suited for students that have met the prerequisite of scoring a 75% or higher on the English Regents Exam.

  • Seniors – College Credit can be earned.

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CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE AND ISSUES

Grade 12

20 weeks
1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: English 11

This course provides an opportunity to study the literature and issues that have shaped America and the world from World War II to the present day. Students will discover the connections between the social and political ideas, movements and events that shaped the post-war world, and how the literature both reflected and influenced those events, ultimately shaping the culture. Students will read ta variety of short and longer texts, including poetry, plays, speeches, essays and short stories. Assignments will include analysis of contemporary themes through essays, oral presentations, creative projects and a critical evaluation of a contemporary self-selected novel. The course will culminate in a research paper exploring a contemporary issue of the student’s choice.

LITERATURE/CINEMA ANALYSIS

20 weeks
1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: English 11

Learn to analyze film as a medium of expression as powerful as literature. Through analytical essays, response journals and discussions, students will develop the ability to perceive the qualities and techniques that make film a compelling medium. Students will also read a work of literature that has been made into a film and analyze the different potentials of literature and film.

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Special Programs

Reading/Grades 9-10
1/2 Credit

Reading/Grades 11-12
1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

These remedial reading courses provide assistance for qualifying students who demonstrate a significant deficit in the area of reading. The classes meet on an alternating day basis and have a maximum enrollment of ten students per section. The reading instructor provides lessons on sequential skills in the areas of work attack, vocabulary development, comprehension and study skills through instructional grouping as well as individualized remediation. Students develop effective strategies needed to increase comprehension and study skills within the content area.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

Family & Consumer Sciences courses are hands-on, practical and relevant classes which help students develop skills to take care of themselves and others. Family & Consumer Sciences classes are divided into three content learning strands: Textile and Design; Foods and Nutrition; and Lifespan Studies (Human Development). Since many Family & Consumer Sciences classes are semester-long, students often schedule two classes for the year. All students are encouraged to include important life skills courses in their high school schedules.

A Family & Consumer Sciences course may be taken by any student in grades 9-12. It is recommended that students schedule their elective credits in a meaningful way. Courses should reflect the student’s individual academic interests and future career plans. All students must satisfy the one unit Fine Arts requirement. Fashion, Housing and Design can be used by any student to fulfill this requirement. Students also need to fulfill the state mandated parenting education requirement. Classes designed to help satisfy this mandate are indicated throughout the Family & Consumer Sciences course offering. Food Science fulfills the third year science requirement.

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Family & Consumer Sciences Learning Strands

Textiles and Design Learning Strand (satisfy Art requirement)

  • Fashion, Housing and Design 1 Credit

Foods and Nutrition Learning Strand

  • Advanced Foods 1/2 Credit
  • Food Preparation 1/2 Credit
  • Food Science* 1 Credit

Lifespan Studies Learning Strand

  • Adolescent Psychology 1/2 Credit
  • Introduction to Child Development 1/2 Credit
  • Child Growth & Development: 1 Credit
    Theory and Observation (offered for college credit)
  • Social Psychology 1/2 Credit
  • Student Teaching  1/2 credit

*Can be used toward a 3rd year math credit.

ALL STUDENTS ARE INVITED TO ENROLL IN FACS COURSES AS ELECTIVES.

Textiles and Design Learning Strand

FASHION, HOUSING AND DESIGN

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

This full-year course offers students opportunities to learn about the concepts of design in the fashion and housing industries. The Fashion component explores clothing history, culture, design principles, equipment, construction and career pathways as well as current issues related to fashion. The Housing component is designed to make students aware of the influence of history, culture, and environment in housing decisions. Both exterior and interior design are explored as well as career pathways in housing and design. This course offers students opportunities to work on hands-on applications of the concepts. These include a clothing construction project, floor plans, and many others.

This course fulfills the Fine Arts graduation requirement for any student.

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Foods and Nutrition Learning Strand

FOOD PREPARATION

Grades 9-12
1/2 Credit

If you are interested in cooking for your family and friends or developing marketable food preparation skills, this is the class for you. Students in this course learn how to meet their nutritional needs through a variety of cooking experiences. Students learn food selection, preparation, and storage techniques that enable them to follow and recipe or create their own. Emphasis is placed on working independently in the kitchen and handling food safely.

ADVANCED FOODS

Grades 10-12
1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: Food Preparation

Are you interested in planning and preparing a variety of foods? In this course students will build on their experiences from the Food Preparation class. Students will have a variety of cooking experiences in areas of convenience foods vs. homemade recipes, appetizers and hors d’oeuvres, stir-fry, breakfast foods, casseroles, yeast breads, basics of cake decorating, cooking around food allergies, soups and sauces, planning a complete meal, and more. Students will also build an understanding of kitchen safety and sanitation, kitchen equipment, knife cut skills, understanding food influences, preparation techniques, and learn about careers in the foods industry.

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FOOD SCIENCE

Grades 11-12
1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:
Course Grades: Successful completion of at least two units of science.
Regents Exams: Passing score on at least one science Regents Exam.

This course is designed to reinforce and enhance the student’s knowledge of scientific principles through the study of food and nutrition. An in-depth understanding of science as it applies to foods will assist students in exploring careers in the foods industry, as well in their daily lives. This course will explore topics of food safety, food production, the availability of food around the world, nutrition concepts, and the market for specialty foods that meet the growing health needs of many people. This course offers students a variety of hands-on learning experiences through classwork, research, experiments, and cooking labs.

This course may satisfy a 3rd year science requirement.

Lifespan Studies Learning Strand

ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

Grades 10-12
1/2 Credit

This course is an overview of adolescent development and the major psychological issues that take place during the teen years. The class provides information on communication skills, decision making, goal setting, peer relationships, conflict resolution, bullying and harassment. Speakers, videos and class discussions are the methods of covering the material. Students will apply theory and research on adolescence to enhance their personal lives.

This course is an option for meeting the parenting education requirement.

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INTRODUCTION TO CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Grades 11-12
1/2 Credit

In Child Development and Psychology, you will explore a wide range of topics related to child growth and development, and nurturing skills. Prenatal development, infancy, children’s play, guidance and discipline, overcoming childhood issues and day-care options, are some of the topics investigated during this course. An overnight simulation with the computerized “Baby Think It Over” doll will help you experience the challenges of parenting.

**This course used to be called Child Development and Psychology. Students who have previously taken Child Development and Psychology should not take this course.

This course is an option for meeting the parenting education requirement.

CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT: THEORY AND OBSERVATION

Grades 11-12
1 Credit

“This course is open to Juniors and Seniors to come join us in a study of the principles of child growth and development from conception to preadolescence.” Course content will focus on physical, cognitive, social, and emotional domains of development. Students will observe the development of children outside of the classroom as part of a child study project, collaborate with other students who are interested in exploring concepts that can be applied to effective parenting, as well as, careers in teaching, counseling/psychiatry, or social work. This course carries 3 college credits. A tuition fee is required for those students taking the class for college credit.

This course is an option for meeting the parenting education requirement.

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SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Grades 10-12
1/2 Credit

Why do people behave as they do? This question is explored in the many topics covered during the semester. Units of study include the work of seven prominent psychologists — from Freud to Maslow. Topics explored are conformity versus individuality, motivational cycles, learning and memory, and abnormal behavior. The end of the semester is highlighted by a wide range of student projects.

This course is an option for meeting the parenting education requirement.

STUDENT TEACHING

Grades 11-12
1/2 credit

Students who are interested in gaining experience working with elementary children will be interested in this course. High school students are placed in district elementary schools to work for the equivalent of one period each day. Classroom instruction on job readiness skills for early childhood/elementary school teachers is also an important piece of this course. Find out about the job of the early childhood/elementary teacher by teaching it out while you are still in high school!

Students who plan to student teach are encouraged to take the Child Development and Psychology class.

This course is an option for meeting the parenting education requirement.

FINE ARTS

Art Education—Sequence in the Visual Arts

New York State Education Department Commissioner’s Regulation 100.2 (e) states: “All public school districts shall offer students the opportunity to complete a five-unit sequence in career and technical education and the arts.”

Five-Unit Visual Arts Sequence Requirements

  • 1 Unit of Study, Studio Art
  • 4 Units of Study, chosen from among the available Visual Art courses

Five-Unit Fine Arts Sequence Requirements

  • 1 unit of Study, Studio Art
  • 1 Unit of Study, chosen from music knowledge/attitude development courses
  • 3 Units of Study, Art or Music

Subjects

  • Art History and Appreciation I & II
  • Art – Independent Study
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing and Painting I & II
  • Graphic Design
  • Lab in Art
  • Photography
  • Studio Art
  • 3D Design

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ART HISTORY AND APPRECIATION I

1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: Studio Art

This course will introduce students to the history of art from prehistoric to Renaissance. Students will study great works of art through history, make connections to art currently being done and inspire them in the creation of their own works. Students will also create their own art history books.

ART HISTORY AND APPRECIATION II

1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: Studio Art

This course will introduce students to the history of art from Renaissance to modern time. Students will study great works of art through history, make connections to art currently being done and inspire them in the creation of their own works. Students will also create their own art history books.

Students do not have to take Art History and Appreciation I to take this course.

CERAMICS

1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: Studio Art

The Ceramics course is designed for students to explore the physical properties and aesthetic possibilities of clay. Students create clay works using pinch, coil, slab, and wheel techniques, and learn glazing, decorating and firing techniques. Students will have opportunities to observe and appreciate contemporary and historical pottery and clay sculpture.

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DRAWING & PAINTING I

1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: Studio Art

A course for serious art students interested in developing skills in drawing from life, making finished drawings in several mediums, and developing drawings into paintings. Line, shading, composition, color and movement will be stressed.

DRAWING & PAINTING II *

1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: Studio Art and Drawing & Painting I.

A course to advance skills learned in Drawing & Painting I and develop personal imagery and style in many mediums.

University in the High School credit available for students in grades 10-12.

* 10th, 11th & 12th grade students – College credit can be earned.

GRAPHIC DESIGN

1/2 Credit

This course is designed to help students to develop familiarity with specific basic art software. Students will become familiar with the basics of Adobe Illustrator CS6 CC. Using the software, a sophisticated graphics program, and students will learn to create complex and attractive illustrations, logo designs and type effects. Both Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop are used in this course.

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LAB IN ART

Grades 11-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Studio Art and approval of instructor.

This class is strongly suggested for any junior or senior for who is passionate about creating art. It is designed for both the student who desires to go to Art College as well as students who wish to further pursue Art on a higher level in high school. It will provide an opportunity to all students to develop a personal or collegiate bound portfolio of work, while exploring individual art works and group assignments. Emphasis will be on observational drawing and creative development of media. Written and oral art criticism and reflection are required.

Participation in a senior art show is required.

PHOTOGRAPHY

1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: Studio Art

Student MUST own a 35 mm camera with manual controls for shutter speed, aperture (f-Stop) and focus in order to register, and be prepared to supply their own photography paper and film.
Objectives include basic techniques and skill in the operation of the camera, developing film, and printing pictures. Artistic composition will be stressed. This course may be applied to the Art sequence.

STUDIO ART

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

(Does not have to be taken in 9th grade.)

A comprehensive foundation course in which the student will be introduced to a wide range of materials and concepts in the creation of visual art. The elements and principles of art will strongly be encouraged and expanded. Art history as well as contemporary art will be taught and used as inspiration for works.

This is a prerequisite for all other art electives. This courses satisfies the Fine Arts graduation requirement.

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Music Education—Sequence in Music

New York State Education Department Commissioner’s Regulation 100.2 (e) states: “All public school districts shall offer students the opportunity to complete a five-unit sequence in career and technical education and the arts.”

Five-Unit Music Sequence Requirements

  • 3 Units of Study, performing music organizations
  • 2 Units of Study, chosen from among the available music knowledge/attitude development courses

Five-Unit Fine Arts Sequence Requirements

  • 1 unit of Study, Studio Art
  • 1 Unit of Study, chosen from music knowledge/attitude development courses
  • 3 Units of Study, Art or Music

Subjects

  • Applied Music
  • Choralaires (Including Lessons)
  • Concert Band (Including Lessons)
  • Concert Choir (Including Lessons)
  • Music History and Literature I & II (Alternate Years)
  • Music in Our Lives (Alternate Years)
  • Music Seminar (Alternate Years)
  • Music Theory (Alternate Years)
  • Orchestra (Including Lessons)
  • Symphonic Band (Including Lessons)

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APPLIED MUSIC

Grades 9-12
1/2 Credit

Prerequisite: Students must have studied privately for a minimum of one full year and must make application through the Director of Fine Arts.

Students taking private lessons outside school on band or orchestral instruments, bagpipes, voice, piano or guitar may apply for credit. Students have to meet practice and lesson requirements and take an examination in June. A half-credit for the year and up to two credits for four years in high school may be earned. Students must reapply for the program each fall.

NOTE: Applied Music grades are not averaged with other school subjects for purposes of the honor roll or class rank.

This option is graded Pass/Fail.

Applied Music may not be used as the Music/Art credit required for graduation.

CHORALAIRES (INCLUDING LESSONS)

Grades 10-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: One year in Concert Choir or by audition of the Choral Director.

This performing organization is a mixed voice choral performing group for students in grades 10-12. Membership is by audition using musical ability, voice quality, and prior experience as selection criteria. The student learns about music through rehearsal and performance. Opportunity is provided for continued growth in vocal productions, technical proficiency and sensitivity to aesthetic musical values.

The principle objectives of Choralaires are the following:
A. to provide an opportunity for students to grow musically through a wide variety of choral literature.
B. To offer an advanced choral experience for serious vocal students.

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CONCERT BAND (INCLUDING LESSONS)

Grades 9-10
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance in middle school band or the approval of the Band Director.

This instrumental organization provides students an opportunity to enjoy music through participation. It is an elective open to students in grades 9-10 who have had continuous instruction and experience in instrumental music. Objectives are to stimulate and develop an interest and understanding of music for the purpose of self-discipline, music appreciation, personal enjoyment, continued individual achievement, musical satisfaction and social belonging through rehearsal and performances. Band performances include various concerts and parades. These provide a colorful and musical contribution to school and community. In addition to daily rehearsal, students will be given group instruction on a weekly basis.

This course satisfies the Fine Arts graduation requirement.

CONCERT CHOIR (INCLUDING LESSONS)

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Concert Choir is an elective mixed voice performing organization open to all students in grades 9-12 who demonstrate a desire to sing.

The principle objective of Concert Choir is the preparation of a wide variety of worthwhile choral works of differing styles for public performance. Growth in general musical ability, improvement of vocal production, improvement of sight reading skills diction are stressed.

This course satisfies the Fine Arts graduation requirement.

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MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE I & II

Grades 10-12
1 Credit

Independent Study

This course will introduce students to the history of classical music from the Medieval through present day. Attention is also given to the influence of traditional, popular and music of other cultures in shaping our musical heritage. (Fulfills music knowledge course requirement.)

MUSIC IN OUR LIVES

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Open to all students in grades 9-12, a one-year course designed to provide students with experiences in listening, performing, composing and learning skills central to music understanding. Course objectives include the ability to listen intelligently to music performed by a wide variety of groups, to compose (organize) music in some medium, to examine the use of music in film and other media, and to be sufficiently familiar with basic elements of music theory as to allow direct involvement in music. (Fulfills music knowledge course requirement.)

This course satisfies the Fine Arts graduation requirement.

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MUSIC SEMINAR

Grades 10-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Music Theory and permission of high school music staff.

More advanced music fundamentals; arranging fundamentals; alternate notations; level two theory. (Fulfills music knowledge course requirement.)

MUSIC THEORY
►►► OFFERED 2022-23

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

An elective course open to students in grades 9-12 with previous music experience. The course is designed to provide a strong background in functional musicianship. The course content includes basic theory of music, chords and chord relationships, chording at the piano, crating piano and vocal arrangements of songs, sight-singing and the study of musical structure as an aid to discriminate listening. (Fulfills music knowledge course requirement.)

ORCHESTRA (INCLUDING LESSONS)

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance in middle school orchestra or the approval of the Orchestra Director.

Orchestra affords students the opportunity to enjoy music through participation. It provides for the continued growth of playing skills and abilities gained through the middle schools years. The principle objective is to allow students to gain an understanding and appreciation of music through the study of a wide variety of orchestral literature.
In addition to daily rehearsals, students will be given group instruction on a weekly basis.

This course satisfies the Fine Arts graduation requirement.

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SYMPHONIC BAND (INCLUDING LESSONS)

Grades 10-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Achievement of necessary playing ability at the discretion of the Band Director.

This instrumental organization provides students an opportunity to enjoy music through participation. It is an elective open to students in grades 10-12 who have had continuous instruction and experience in instrumental music. Objectives are to stimulate and develop an interest and understanding of music for the purpose of self-discipline, music appreciation, personal enjoyment, continued individual achievement, musical satisfaction and social belonging through rehearsals and performances. Band performances include various concerts, assemblies, home football games and parades. These three provide a colorful and musical contribution to school and community. In addition to daily rehearsals, students will be given group instruction on a weekly basis.

MATHEMATICS

  • Algebra I Part 1
  • Algebra I
  • Geometry Part 1^
  • Geometry
  • Geometry Honors
  • Algebra II Part 1^
  • Algebra^
  • Algebra II Honors^
  • Pre-Calculus*
  • AP Statistics *
  • AP Calculus AB *
  • AP Calculus BC *
  • Business Math * (also listed under the Business Dept.)
  • Game Design Math ^*
  • College Mathematics Part 1 (Fall)^
  • College Mathematics Part 2 (Spring)^
  • AP Computer Science Principles (INTRO) ^*
  • AP Computer Science A (JAVA) ^*

* 10th, 11th & 12th grade students – College credit can be earned.
^ Can be used toward a 3rd year math credit.

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ALGEBRA I PART 1

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of Math 8 and teacher recommendation; Recommended for students who achieve an average of 75 or lower on Math 8 course grades.
  • Regents Exams: None.

This course will cover many topics from the Algebra syllabus while strengthening many of the Pre-Algebra concepts. Topics will include numbers and number systems, solving equations and inequalities, statistics, graphing and coordinate geometry. This course is designed to prepare students for Algebra and the Algebra I Regents Exam to be taken in the next academic year. Students are required to take a final school examination as part of their overall grade at the end of Algebra Part I.

ALGEBRA I

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 75+ in Math 8 or Algebra I Part 1 is recommended.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I Regents or working toward the Algebra I Regents.

This course is required for entrance into most colleges and is a prerequisite for further study in mathematics and science at the Regents level. The topics covered will include functions, systems of equations, quadratic and absolute value equations, graphing linear and quadratic equations and statistics. Instructional approach and content of the course are based on the New York State Standards for Mathematics. Students are required to take the Algebra I Regents Exam.

GEOMETRY PART 1

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Recommended for students who achieve a 75 or lower in Algebra I course.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I Regents or working toward the Algebra I Regents.

This course will include study of approximately half of the Geometry curriculum and prepare students to complete Geometry and the associated Regents exam in the following year. This course can serve as the third year of a three-year college preparatory sequence. Students enrolled in Geometry Part 1 will take Local final examination.

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GEOMETRY

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 75+ in Algebra I course.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I Regents Exam.

This is the second course in the Advanced Regents sequence and is based on the New York State Geometry Standards. Topics covered will include geometric relationships, constructions, locus, informal and formal proof, transformational geometry, and coordinate geometry. Students are required to take the Geometry Regents Exam at the end of the course. (Graphing calculators are required for the Geometry Regents Exam).

geometry HONORS

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Geometry Part I or College Mathematics Part 1.

This is the second course in the Advanced Regents sequence and is based on the New York State Geometry Standards. Topics covered will include geometric relationships, constructions, locus, informal and formal proof, transformational geometry, and coordinate geometry. Students are required to take the Geometry Exam at the end of the course. The Geometry Honors course includes additional topics and a higher level of challenge overall. (Graphing calculators are required for the Geometry Regents Exam).

ALGEBRA II PART 1

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 75+ in Geometry course.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I and Geometry Regents Exam.

This course provides a thorough and extensive study of Algebra, including the study of linear relationships in one, two and three variables, quadratics (including complex numbers), square root functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Additionally students will receive an introduction to the basics of trigonometry. For those interested in a 3-year Regents sequence leading to an Advanced Regents Diploma, Algebra II Part 1 is an excellent preparatory course for Algebra II. For others, this course can help provide a solid foundation for further study of mathematics, including college level work at Scotia-Glenville and beyond.

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ALGEBRA II

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of Geometry and Algebra I with final grade performance of 80+ in Geometry or Algebra I.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I and Geometry Regents Exam with a score of 75+ on the Algebra I Regents Exam.

This is the third course in the Advanced Regents sequence. Topics covered will include polynomials, factoring, real and complex numbers, relations and functions, trigonometry, logarithms, probability and systems modeling. Topics will be covered in an integrated manner and graphing calculators will be used extensively. Students are required to take the Algebra II Regents Exam. (Graphing calculators are required for the Common Core Algebra II Regents Exam).

algebra II Honors

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of Geometry and Algebra I with final grade performance of 80+ in Geometry or Algebra I.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I and Geometry Regents Exam with a score of 85+ on the Algebra I or Geometry Regents Exam.

This is the third course in the Advanced Regents sequence. Topics covered will include polynomials, factoring, real and complex numbers, relations and functions, trigonometry, logarithms, probability and systems modeling. Topics will be covered in an integrated manner and graphing calculators will be used extensively. Students are required to take the Algebra II Regents Exam. Algebra II HONORS represents an honors level in this course and offers enrichment in the topics leading to the study of Calculus. (Graphing calculators are required for the Algebra II Regents Exam).

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pre-calculus

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 80+ in Algebra II-R or Algebra II-H.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II Regents Exam.

This is a unified course of algebra and analytical geometry that is intended to develop an understanding of elementary functions at the pre-calculus level. Topics include trigonometry, including circular functions, equations, formulas, graphs and modeling; functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, polar coordinates and limits. Students are required to take the final school examination as part of their overall grade. TI-84 Graphing calculators are used extensively. Four college credits can be earned.

AP STATISTICS

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 80+ in CC Algebra II-R or CC Algebra II-H or permission of the Academic Head for Mathematics & Science.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II Regents Exam.

This course is designed to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data, Sampling and Experimentation, Anticipating Patterns, and Statistical Inference. The AP Exam is given in May and is required as part of the course. Students are also required to take a final exam. Graphing calculators are required. There is a fee to take the AP Exam. This is an excellent course for students intending to study psychology, medicine, statistics or actuarial science, computer science, research or any field of study related to the analysis and manipulation of data.

AP CALCULUS AB

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 85+ in Pre-Calculus.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II Regents Exam.

This course is equivalent to college-level Calculus 1 and includes the basis of analytic geometry necessary for the foundation of calculus as well as the topics of limits, derivatives, applications of the derivative, integrations and exponential and logarithmic functions. The AP Exam for advanced placement is given in May and is required. Students are also required to take a final school exam. Graphing calculators are required. There is a fee to take the AP Exam.

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AP CALCULUS BC

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of AP Calculus AB; Course admission may be granted with successful completion of Pre-Calculus, teacher recommendation and permission from the Academic Head for Mathematics.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II Regents Exam.

This advanced Calculus course covers both the first and second semester of college calculus with a B.C. Exam administered in May. Topics include differential and integral calculus, polar representation, infinite series, and parametric and vector functions. Successful completion of the B.C. Exam can lead to 8 college credits being awarded to the student. There is a fee to take the B.C. Exam.

BUSINESS MATHEMATICS

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of Algebra I and at least one additional math credit.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I Regents Exam.

This course emphasizes the concepts of mathematics as they apply to a wide-range of personal and commercial business problems. The topics covered include how to dissect and solve word problems; fractions, decimals; banking; percents and their applications; trade and cash discounts; payroll; simple interest; compound interest and present value; installment buying; depreciation; and inventory and overhead.

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GAME DESIGN MATHEMATICS

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of Algebra I and at least one additional math credit.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I Regents Exam.

This course is an introduction to game design concepts and computer programming. Students will learn and apply through the lens of Algebra I and Geometry.

Students will learn about how systems work and how they can be modified or changed using their understanding of math. Students learn to think analytically, to experiment and test theories, and to collaborate with others to successfully build a working system. Students will focus on concepts such as order of operations, the Cartesian plane, function composition and definition, and solving word problems – all within the context of video game design.

At the end of the course, students will have written programs to build composite images, animations, and a complete video game of their own design, all of which can be shared to demonstrate mastery of programming and algebra.

No code writing skills are required for the course.

COLLEGE MATHEMATICS PART 1 (FALL)

1/2 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

Course Grades: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry or Geometry Part 1.
Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I Regents Exam.

This course is designed to acquaint students to various topics in college mathematics. Among the topics discussed are logic, geometry (Euclidean and Non-Euclidian), statistics, and probability.

COLLEGE MATHEMATICS PART 2 (SPRING)

1/2 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

Course Grades: Successful completion of Algebra I and  Geometry or Geometry Part 1; College Mathematics Part I is typically taken before College Mathematics Part II.
Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I Regents Exam.

This course is designed to further investigate mathematical topics students will encounter in college. Among the topics investigated are mathematical systems, functions (including exponential and logarithmic), and trigonometry.

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AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES (intro)

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of Algebra I.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I Regents Exam.

The AP Computer Science Principles (INTRO) course is an introductory computer science course designed to help students take their first step in the study of computer programming, data representation and the impact of technology on society. The course is unique in its focus on fostering student’s creativity. Students will be encouraged to apply creative processes when developing computation artifacts and to think creatively while using computer software and other technology to explore questions that interest them. In this course, students will also develop computational thinking skills vital for success across all disciplines, such as using computational tools to analyze and study data and working with large data sets to analyze,visualize, and draw conclusion from trends. Students will also develop effective communication and collaboration skills, working individually and collaboratively to solve problems, and discussing and writing about the importance of these problems and the impacts to their community,society, and the world.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A (JAVA)

 1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of Algebra I.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Algebra I Regents Exam.

The AP Computer Science A (JAVA) course is equivalent to a first-semester, college-level course in computer science. The course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms),analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design using JAVA language. These techniques represent proven approaches for developing solutions that can scale up from small, simple problems to large, complex problems. The AP Computer Science A (JAVA) course curriculum is compatible with many CS1 courses in colleges and universities.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Required Physical Education Program

The Physical Education Program is a requirement for all students in Grades 9-12. One-half credit is given in grades 9-12. Each class period a student is graded on a 100 point scale based on the following STEP Program:

  • Skill – 20%
  • Total Citizenship – 20%
  • Effort – 40%
  • Participation – 20%

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 9-12

1/2 Credit

Students will apply their knowledge and skill sets to perform proper motor and manipulative skills while demonstrating good strategies and positive citizenship in a variety of individual and team sports, as well as, lifetime activities that cover self-defense and personal responsibility.

Students will be given a choice of activities once a semester.

Students will be assessed in the core principals of Athleticism, develop and maintain proper sport posture and movement, demonstrate competency of agility (ability to change direction while maintaining balance), demonstrate hand/eye and foot/eye accuracy, understand and demonstrate the application of fundamental motor skills, and understand and demonstrate the application of strategy.

Students will demonstrate competency in project adventure education based on noncompetitive, cooperative, team building experiences through our indoor Five High Adventure Course.

Seniors will design a personal fitness program to improve cardio-respiratory endurance, flexibility, muscular strength, and endurance and body composition while developing a plan for stress management. In addition, seniors will participate in leading a sport model activity and complete a citizenship project.

Students will analyze themselves and develop skill sets to maintain a lifetime of wellness and fitness that reflect their personal interests.

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SCIENCE/HEALTH

Science Department

  • Living Environment (L)
  • Living Environment Part I (L)
  • Living Environment Part II (L)
  • Earth Science (P)
  • Chemistry (P)
  • Chemistry Honors (P)
  • Physics (P)
  • AP Biology (L)
  • AP Chemistry (P)
  • Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) Physics I and II (P)*
  • Environmental Science (P or L)^
  • Food Science (P)^ (also listed under the FACS Department)
  • Introduction to Medicine (L)^
  • Robotics (P)^
  • Science and Engineering (P)^
  • Sports, Anatomy, Physiology and Nutrition Science (L)^

(L) = Course can count toward the required life science credit for graduation.
(P) = Course can count toward the required physical science credit for graduation.

* 10th, 11th & 12th grade students – College credit can be earned

^ Can be used toward a 3rd year science credit.

LIVING ENVIRONMENT

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Recommended of current science teacher.
  • Regents Exams: Living Environment Regents Exam

This course considers the new perspectives in Living Environment in light of the discoveries that have occurred within the last twenty years. Major topics include: cellular structures and processes, genetics, human body systems, ecology, and evolution. A quantitative approach is utilized throughout the course and laboratory. Scientific investigation is illustrated as a process involving data collection, hypothesis formation, and data analysis to reach conclusions. This course requires the completion of all laboratory investigations. The Living Environment Regents Exam is the final examination for this course. Successful completion of this course earns Regents credit in Science.

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LIVING ENVIRONMENT PART I

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Department approval required.
  • Regents Exams: None.

The Living Environment Part I course is the first year of a two-year program and focuses on topics found in the first half of the Biology curriculum. This program, in conjunction with the Living Environment Part II course the following year, culminates in the NYS Living Environment Regents Exam. This course requires the completion of all laboratory investigations and final examination.

LIVING ENVIRONMENT PART II

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of Living Environment Part I and all laboratories associated with Living Environment Part I.
  • Regents Exams: Living Environment Regents Exam.

The Living Environment Part II course is the second year of a two-year program and focuses on topics found in the second half of the Living Environment curriculum. This program, in conjunction with the Living Environment Part I course the previous year, culminates in the NYS Living Environment Regents Exam. This course requires the completion of all laboratory investigations and the New York State Regents Examination. The Living Environment Regents Exam serves as the final exam for the Living Environment B course.

EARTH SCIENCE

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Recommendation of current science teacher; Successful completion of CC Algebra I or enrolled in CC Algebra I.
  • Regents Exams: Earth Science Regents Exam.

This course presents a broad array of the Earth Science content from the New York State Physical Setting Core Curriculum with emphasis on examples from NYS. Topics in geology, meteorology and astronomy will be examined through hands-on laboratory experiences. This course requires students to make observations and interpretations involving mathematical computations. Therefore, students should be enrolled in, or have previously taken Algebra I. The Earth Science course requires the completion of all laboratory investigations (prior to any portion of the NYS Regents Exam) and the New York State Regents Examination in Earth Science. The Earth Science Regents Exam also requires a Performance Test to be administered prior to the written Regents Exam.

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CHEMISTRY

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 75+ in Earth Science; Final grade performance of 75+ in Algebra I and/or Geometry.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Living Environment Regents Exam* and Earth Science Regents Exam; Passing score on the Algebra I Regents Exam.

This course is directed toward those students who plan to attend a 4-year college or university. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical concepts of chemical studies but also on the practical application of chemistry. Students will have weekly laboratory work and the Chemistry Regents Exam is the final exam for this course. The course provides a solid fundamental understanding of chemistry. It is a good choice for any student, but particularly for those interested in forensics, engineering, science, math, health related fields, and many other potential fields of study.

*9th Grade students who wish to take Chemistry may be exempt from the Living Environment Regents prerequisite provided they score 80% or higher on the Algebra I Regents.

CHEMISTRY honors

 1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 85+ in Earth Science; Final grade performance of 85+ in CC Algebra I and/or CC Geometry.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Living Environment Regents Exam* and Earth Science Regents Exam; Passing score on the Algebra I Regents Exam.

This course is directed toward those students who plan to attend a 4-year college or university. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical concepts of chemical studies but also on the practical application of chemistry. Students will have weekly laboratory work and the Chemistry Regents Exam is the final exam for the course. This course provides a solid fundamental understanding of chemistry. It is a good choice for any student, but particularly for those interested in forensics, engineering, science, math, health related fields, and many other potential fields of study.

Students enrolled in Chemistry Honors are expected to take a college level or AP Chemistry course in subsequent years. Honors Chemistry is distinguished from Regents Chemistry as the course will go above and beyond material covered in the Regents level course.

*9th Grade students who wish to take Chemistry may be exempt from the Living Environment Regents prerequisite provided they score 85% or higher on the Algebra I Regents.

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PHYSICS

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 75+ in Chemistry; Final grade performance of 75+ in CC Algebra II*.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Living Environment, Earth Science, Chemistry Regents Exams; Passing score on the Algebra I, Geometry & Algebra II* Regents Exams.

*Algebra II may be taken concurrently provided the other prerequisites have been met. Approval of Department Head required.

Physics is a study of energy through the lens of five major topics: mechanics, heat, waves, electricity and magnetism, and modern/atomic physics. The course is essentially mathematical in its approach, so students should be familiar with basic algebra and trigonometry. This course is essential for anyone planning a career in science, health related fields, computer science, law, engineering or mathematics to name a few. Weekly laboratory work is an integral part of this course. The Physics Regents Exam is the final exam of this course. Note: Students will be exposed to right triangle trigonometry in this course and may not have learned that topic in their respective math class yet.

AP BIOLOGY

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 85+ in Chemistry*.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Living Environment, Earth Science and Chemistry* Regents Exams.

*Physics may be taken concurrently provided the other prerequisites have been met. Approval of Department Head required.

This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. The AP Biology course is designed to be taken by students after the successful completion of Chemistry. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. Major topics of study include: biochemistry, cell structure and function, cellular energetics, cell communication and cell cycle, heredity, genetics, natural selection and ecology. Students are required to complete the laboratory portion of the course which will address labs required by the College Board. The Advanced Placement Examination is required of all students enrolled in the course. A fee is charged by the College Board for this exam.

AP CHEMISTRY

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 85+ in Chemistry and Physics or SUPA Physics*; Final grade performance of 85+ in CC Algebra II*.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Living Environment, Earth Science, Chemistry and Physics* Regents Exams; Passing score on the Algebra II* Regents Exam.

*Physics and Algebra II may be taken concurrently provided the other prerequisites have been met. Approval of Department Head required.

The AP Chemistry course provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced coursework in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore content such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium. The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. This course also includes a laboratory period which allows students participate in required lab investigations. The Advanced Placement Examination is required of all students enrolled in the course. A fee is charged by the College Board for this exam. It is also possible to participate in the SCCC UHS program. College credit can be earned for Chem 121 and Chem 122. There is also a fee for these credits.

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SUPA PHYSICS I & ii
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY PROJECT ADVANCE

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Final grade performance of 85+ in living Environment and Chemistry; Final grade performance of 85+ in CC Algebra II*.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on the Living Environment, Earth Science, Chemistry and Physics Regents Exams; Passing score on the Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II* Regents Exams.

*Algebra II may be taken concurrently provided the other prerequisites have been met. Approval of Department Head required.

This physics sequence is offered locally through Syracuse University. This algebra-based course includes a regularly scheduled lab and provides an excellent conceptual background. It is a good introduction for students who are first learning physics and who may later enroll in a calculus-based physics course. The first semester with cover traditional motion, work, energy, momentum, rotational motion, vibrations and kinetic theory. The second semester stresses problem solving and conceptual understanding, including topics such as electricity, magnetism and optics. Students paying the discounted fee can earn up to 8 college credits and will receive a Syracuse University transcript.

Chemistry of life

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

Successful completion of two science credits and passing one science Regents Exam; Successful completion of Algebra I and passing one math regents exam.

Chemistry of Life is a multidisciplinary course that focuses on the practical application of chemical and biological concepts. Students will explore theories and investigate practical application of the concepts of biology and chemistry related to the medical industry, technology, and everyday life. The core curriculum will be applied to medicine and health practices, forensic studies, biochemical relationships within the body, bacterial and viral relationships to chemistry, lab techniques, and science related careers. This course is geared toward students with an interest in nursing, emergency medical technicians, paramedics, medical assistants and medical technicians.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Required: Successful Completion of at least two units of science; Recommended: Final grade performance of 80+ in Living Environment.
  • Regents Exams: Required: Passing score on at least one Regents Exam in science; Recommended: Passing score on the Living Environment Regents Exam.

The Environmental Science course examines the mutual relationships between organisms and their environment. In studying the interrelationships among plants, animals, and humans, this course will cover the following topics including, but not limited to: photosynthesis, recycling and regeneration, ecosystems, population and growth studies, pollution, and conservation of natural resources. This course will include authentic studies of environmental science issues as they impact Schenectady county and New York, specifically, as well as global impacts. Field work and hands-on labs will be the cornerstone of this course.

FOOD SCIENCE

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of at least two units of science.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on at least one science Regents Exam.

This course is designed to reinforce and enhance the student’s knowledge of scientific principles through the study of food and nutrition. An in-depth understanding of science as it applies to foods will assist students in exploring careers in the foods industry, as well in their daily lives. This course will explore topics of food safety, food production, the availability of food around the world, nutrition concepts, and the market for specialty foods that meet the growing health needs of many people. This course offers students a variety of hands-on learning experiences through classwork, research, experiments, and cooking labs.

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INTRODUCTION TO MEDICINE

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Required: Successful Completion of at least two units of science; Recommended: Successful completion of Living Environment and chemistry.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on at on the Living Environment Regents Exam.

This course is designed to develop an understanding of the introduction to medicine needed to make informed decisions about ones own health care as well as those of family members. Students completing this course will also have a solid framework for more advanced biomedical courses in the future. The focus of this course will be human anatomy, physiology, symptomology, pathology and the medical terminology associated with the diagnosis and treatments of the disease processes. Current medical innovations/issues and bioethics will also be discussed.

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Paleobiology

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

Successful completion of two science credits and passing one science regents exam.

An astonishing 99 percent of all species that ever lived on our planet are now extinct. How have mass extinction events shaped our planet? What types of life forms have existed throughout history? What types of evolutionary adaptations have Earth’s species made in order to survive on our changing planet?

Paleobiologists combine elements of paleontology, geology, and biology as they answer these and other questions by using snapshots of the past to uncover the narrative of this planet’s living history.

Students explore the many modes of fossilization, investigate key geological concepts, and classify the major phyla of animal and plant life in ancient and modern forms. Students examine present-day organisms in order to make comparisons with extinct life forms, identifying adaptations that have led to stronger survival rates. Students leave the course with a deeper understanding of the science behind dinosaur extinction theories, the development of human life, and the overall history of life on Earth, with a special focus on New York State.

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SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of at least two units of science.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on at least one science Regents Exam.

This course focuses on the application of science principles to identify and implement real-world engineering solutions. Students study, design and test various engineering solutions of their own design. Projects include but are not limited to bridge building, aeronautics, genetic engineering and robotics. Research questions will involve student-guided exploration of current scientific topics and questions, including a study of ethics. Investigations will include video analysis and data collection to gain a better understanding of how scientific information helps support and guide engineering design. Assessment in this course is authentic, and based on evidence of the student’s ability to engage in solid engineering practices.

SPORTS ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY AND NUTRITION SCIENCE

1 Credit

Recommended Prerequisites:

  • Course Grades: Successful completion of at least two units of science.
  • Regents Exams: Passing score on at least one science Regents Exam.

This course is designed to give students an in-depth understanding of the impact on the human body when it is engaged in sports activities. Areas of study will include components of exercise science/sports medicine; including exploration of therapeutic careers, medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, first aid, injury prevention principles, related diseases and disorders, the healing process, rehabilitation techniques, sport nutrition, and performance enhancement philosophies. Students will study the long and short term effects of training and conditioning on athletes. The effects of body composition, flexibility training, hydration, environmental conditions and carbohydrate loading are a few of the topics that will be covered. Students will develop and study individualized exercise prescriptions to increase physical fitness, improve wellness and enhance athletic performance.

Health Department

HEALTH EDUCATION

Grade 10
1/2 Credit

Required for graduation from high school

Health Education is a skills-based course that addresses all of the dimensions of health and wellness. Learning opportunities focus on the national priority areas, including wellness lifestyles, mental health, nutrition and fitness, substance abuse, disease prevention, human sexuality and environmental health. Students work individually and collaboratively in a variety of settings to examine contemporary health issues. Students will be involved in activities that enhance their research, advocacy, communication and decision-making skills. And will work collaboratively in a variety of settings to examine contemporary issues. Students will be involved in activities that enhance their research, advocacy, communication and decision-making skills. And collaboratively in a variety of settings to examine contemporary heal issues. Students will be involved in activities that enhance their research, advocacy, communication and decision-making skills.

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SOCIAL STUDIES

  • Global History and Geography 9
  • Global History and Geography 9-H
  • AP World History
  • Global History and Geography 10
  • AP United States History
  • United States History and Government 11
  • AP Psychology

Grade Twelve

  • AP Microeconomics/Enriched Participation in Government
  • Economics, the Enterprise System and Finance
  • Participation in Government 12

The Regents Level Course

In a Regents level course, a student follows a course of study patterned on the Learning Standards of the New York State Education Department. Students develop critical thinking and communication skills through extensive readings and the analysis of visual materials. The ability to extract, analyze, synthesize and evaluate information will be critical to a student’s success. The understanding of significant content and the ability to make higher level generalizations and conclusions will be a necessity.

The Honors Course (H Level)

An honors level course is an enrichment of the mandated New York State Education Department course of study. Students must demonstrate a high degree of critical thinking skill in their written and oral communication. This course demands initiative and responsibility on the part of the student in addition to the need for well developed comprehension skills. Reading selections will be on grade level or above. Students will be apprised of Honor and Advanced Placement course application and selection procedures in their social studies class. Departmental committees will be convened to review applications. Criteria for selection into these courses will include:

  • Course average for current school year
  • Teacher recommendation
  • Letter of intent
  • Quality of homework completion
  •  Class participation

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GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 9

Grade 9
1 Credit

This course is designed to focus on the five social studies standards, common themes that recur across time and place and four historical eras. These eras are: Ancient World: Civilizations and Religion (4000 BC-500 AD), Expanding Zones of exchange and Encounter (500-1200), Global Interactions (1200-1650) and the First Global Age (1450-1770). The two-year Global History Course will culminate in a Global History Regents Exam at the conclusion of the sophomore year. Assessment of comprehension of textual assignments will occur on a regular basis. Therefore, reading aptitude will be a major factor in student success. Additional components of the program will include work on writing and organizational skills. Homework assignments, generally one-half in length, will be assigned most evenings.

GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 9-H

Grade 9
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of Eighth Grade Social Studies with a grade of 90% or better, exemplary work ethic, and teacher recommendation.

Designed for able students who intend to pursue a college education, this enriched course involves students with an understanding of the diversity of ideas, values and traditions that shape their lives and decisions. It focuses upon the interrelationships of worldwide systems dealing with technology, economics, politics and social issues. The purpose of the 9H course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This curriculum is aligned with the objectives of AP World History. Supplemental readings and independent research are utilized to enhance the student’s ability to analytically interpret the past and present in a variety of world regions.

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AP WORLD HISTORY

Grade 10
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of Global History 9 or 9-H with a grade of 90% or better, exemplary work ethic, and teacher recommendation.

This course is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal with problems and materials in World History. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands on them equivalent to those made by a full-year introductory college course.

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. This course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. It emphasizes relevant factual knowledge used in conjunction with leading interpretive methods of historical issues.

All members of the class will be required to take the Advance Placement Exam. There is a fee for this AP examination. Students will also be required to take the Global History Regents Exam.

GLOBAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 10

Grade 10
1 Credit

This course is the second year in the state-mandated two-year sequence in Global History. It is designed to focus on the five social studies standards, common themes that recur across time and place, three historical eras, and a course summary unit. These eras are: An Age of Revolutions (1750-1914), A Half-Century of Crisis and Achievement (1900-1945), The 20th Century Since 1945, and Global Connections and Interactions. The two-year Global History course will culminate in a Global History Regents Exam at the conclusion of the sophomore year. In this course, a variety of social studies skills will be addressed. Writing skills, particularly as they relate to the new assessment program, including document-based and thematic questions, will be emphasized. Completion of homework and project assignments will be critical to student success, and an average of one-half hour of study will be assigned each night.

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AP UNITED STATES HISTORY

Grade 11
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of Global History 10 with a grade of 90% or better, exemplary work ethic, and teacher recommendation.

Advanced Placement United States History is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the core themes of: diversity, identity, culture, demographics, economics, globalization, politics, citizenship, reform, religion, war and diplomacy in American history.

Candidates for Advanced Placement US History should possess a high degree of self-motivation and a willingness to discuss issues. They should have excellent reading, writing and analytical skills and be accustomed to submitting their assignments in a punctual fashion. All members of the class will be required to take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. There is a fee for this AP examination. Students will also be required to take the US History Regents Exam.

UNITED STATES HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT

Grade 11
1 Credit

This course is designed to offer students a good understanding of constitutional and legal issues and will provide an overview of United States history from the period of Reconstruction (1865). The emphasis in this course will be the United States as an industrial nation. Higher levels of abstract thinking, a facility for manipulating knowledge, and the ability to formulate logical conclusions will be essential for success. Good reading skills will be of paramount importance. The completion of sequential homework assignments will be a necessary part of the learning process. Written assignments will be given in order to sharpen research and communication skills. Home study will average about one-half hour per evening. Students will also be required to take the US History Regents Exam.

AP PSYCHOLOGY

Grades 11-12
1 credit

Human behavior has always fascinated people. For a psychologist, the scientific study of human behavior is a life’s work. In AP Psychology, students seek to describe, explain, predict and understand mental and behavioral processes. Topics studied in AP Psychology include the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, language, growth and development, and the behaviors of people in groups. Class activities range from lecture/discussions to demonstrations and projects.

Students selecting AP Psychology should be strong readers with significant science backgrounds. The AP Psychology course meets daily for a full year, and students enrolled in AP Psychology take the national AP Exam in May. Success in AP Psychology and on the AP Exam can provide college credit in psychology.

This course is an option for meeting the parenting education requirements.

Grade Twelve

All students are required to take a fourth year of social studies. The courses that are prescribed by the New York State Education Department are Economics and Participation in Government.

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AP MICROECONOMICS / ENRICHED PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT

Grade 12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of US History 11 with a grade of 90% or better, exemplary work ethic, and teacher recommendation.

Advanced Placement Microeconomics / Enriched Participation in Government substitutes for the required Economics and Microeconomics Exam. Students are required to take the AP Exam.

The course is an intensive study of the complex principles of microeconomics (supply and demand, consumer choice, theory of the firm, and competitive markets). In addition, an in-depth study of government with an emphasis on public policy and responsible citizenship will be accomplished. Prior honors or AP level experience is not necessary. All members of the class are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam. There is a fee to take the AP Exam.

ECONOMICS, THE ENTERPRISE SYSTEM AND FINANCE

Grade 12
1/2 Credit

The objective of this course is to assist students in becoming responsible citizens and effective decision makers. This course will help students to understand basic economic concepts, assist them with techniques to identify economic issues that they may confront as consumers, workers and employers, and provide them with the ability to use the elements of economic understanding to address a variety of specifics which society will need to address in the future. Content areas will include economic systems, microeconomics (business, labor, agriculture, etc.), macroeconomics (money, taxation, economic indicators, etc.), and world trade.

PARTICIPATION IN GOVERNMENT

Grade 12
1/2 Credit

The primary goal of this course is to facilitate and encourage the development of civic-minded individuals capable of effectively fulfilling the “office of citizen” that is a fundamental precept of democracy and a right and obligation guaranteed by the 14th Amendment of the Constitution. Students will have the opportunity to develop and refine skills in decision-making, to engage in civic action programs, to analyze public issues in the process of a group dynamic, to perceive how values effect decision-making and to develop a process to make informal judgments concerning public money policy issues.

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TECHNOLOGY

Fine Arts Requirements—Design and Drawing for Production and DDP/ITT (9th grade only) may be used to fulfill a Fine Arts requirement.

AEROSPACE

Grades 10-12
1/2 Credit

Aerospace provides an overview of the essentials of flight and aerospace travel. Flight fundamentals, navigation, propulsion systems and career opportunities are topics covered in this course. Students also learn pilot controls and small craft operation. Activities include aircraft design and wind tunnel testing, rocketry, and glider building.

AUTOMOTIVES (LAND TRANSPORTATION)

Grades 11-12
1/2 Credit

Automotives is a course designed to teach high school students proper car maintenance. A second important component of this course is educated consumerism. Students learn about essential systems in a car and perform the basic maintenance necessary to keep a vehicle in good running order. They also learn about the more complex components of both engine and chassis in a format which allows them to become an informed consumer should their vehicle require service.

COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

Grades 10-12
1/2 Credit

Communications is a survey course covering different methods of communicating ideas. Students develop messages in the areas of audio, visual, written, and electronic formats. A major focus of this course is organization. Each assignment a student completes involves the design process, and incorporates the basic elements of design. Students sharpen their problem solving and organizational skills through brainstorming and group project work along with their individual assignments.

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DESIGN AND DRAWING FOR PRODUCTION / ITT

Grade 9 only
1 Credit

DDP is a course designed to develop problem-solving skills using computer aided drawing (CAD) to represent design ideas. In the first part of this course students learn the basics of drawing and rendering to represent ideas. The focus of this component is mechanical drawing fundamentals and 3-D rendering. A second component of the course concentrates on problem-solving skills where students are challenged to develop solutions to stated problems and to then use their drawing and modeling skills to present their solution. This is a full year technology course offered in the high school and can be used to fulfill the Fine Arts requirement (NYSED requirement for graduation). The ITT content component of this class will have students survey the various Technology Education topics that are available at the high school level. The spirit of this survey is to allow students to explore different elective topics for future class selection and ultimately college and career pursuits.

DESIGN AND DRAWING FOR PRODUCTION

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

DDP is a course designed to develop problem-solving skills using computer aided drawing (CAD) to represent design ideas. In the first part of this course students learn the basics of drawing and rendering to represent ideas. The focus of this component is mechanical drawing fundamentals and 3-D rendering. The second part of the course concentrates on problem-solving skills where students are challenged to develop solutions to stated problems and to then use their drawing and modeling skills to present their solution. This is the only full year technology course offered in the high school and can be used to fulfill the Fine Arts requirement (NYSED requirement for graduation).

ELECTRICITY / ELECTRONICS

Grades 10-12
1/2 Credit

Electricity/Electronics is a course where students learn what electricity is, how we make it do work for us, and how it is controlled through electronics. Students study the principles behind electronic fundamentals and basic circuitry while applying those principles to a series of projects. Students work on a series of projects in this course including house wiring, building a DC motor, and assembling electronic kits.

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RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION

Grades 10-12
1/2 Credit

Residential Construction is a course on how a building is built. Students study foundations and framing methods while building a scale model shed. They complete activities in plumbing and roofing as they learn about the infrastructure involved in building a home. The course culminates in a full sized shed being built in the classroom and then transported and erected on the owners’ property.

Robotics

Grades 10-12   
1/2 Credit

This is an introductory course into bot Robotics and computer programming. Students will build, test and conduct missions using at least three different types of robots, including but not limited to Arduino, SeaPerch submarine robots, and Vex Clawbots. Students will learn to program using Robot C, coding applications for multiple robot peripherals including line tracers, bump stops, limit switches, speakers, range finders and more. The course will include study of ethical issues surrounding the use of robots, employment issues and employment possibilities. Students will also study various types of robots in use throughout industry, scientific research, fire and rescue, exploration and space travel. This course is an excellent first step in a programming sequence of study including AP Computer Science Principles (INTRO) and/or AP Computer Science A (JAVA).

SMALL ENGINES (TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS)

Grades 9-12
1/2 Credit

Small Engines is an introductory course to power technology. Students learn how power is produced from burning fuel, and then apply those principles to different small engine powered vehicles. This class is based on small engine repair and rebuilding, and covers modes of transportation over land and water and through the air.

WOODWORKING (MATERIALS PROCESSING)

Grades 9-12
1/2 Credit

Students in woodworking learn to properly use tools and machines to make products from wood. Students complete several projects while learning methods of machining, fabrication, assembly, and finishing. This course is the most traditional of the technology courses offered in the high school and offers a student a broad range of useable skills as well as a series of take home projects.

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WORLD LANGUAGES (WL)

  • French B1
  • French B2
  • French B3
  • College French 1
  • College French 2
  • German B1
  • German B2
  • German B3
  • College German 1
  • College German 2
  • Spanish B1
  • Spanish B2
  • Spanish B3
  • College Spanish 1
  • College Spanish 2

The primary aim of instruction in the Level B1, 2 and 3 courses in French, German and Spanish is to develop competency in listening, speaking, reading and writing, and to provide knowledge of the culture of the countries in which these languages are spoken.

These courses meet daily. Each year students continue to build on the basic communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Class time is devoted to oral practice, as well as reading, writing and listening in the WL*.

Audio recordings prepared by native speakers provide practice in listening and speaking skills. Poetry, popular and traditional songs, word games, magazines, newspapers, videos, readers, short stories and films are used to supplement text materials.

The Checkpoint B Exam is administered at the end of Level B3. A passing grade on this examination fulfills the WL* requirements for a Regents Diploma with Advanced Designation. Many universities look for a three-, four-, or five-year high school sequence in WL* on students’ applications. Many universities also require a minimum number of semesters of WL* study by their students while in college.

The College French, College German, and College Spanish courses allow language students the opportunity to further develop and apply their WL* skills to the study of literature as well as cultural and historical issues. Students enrolled in a College Level 1 or 2 course may earn 3 university credits after earning a grade of 74 or better in the course.

To ensure maximum skill development, a four– or five-year course sequence is recommended.

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* World Languages

FRENCH B1

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Passing score on the French Checkpoint A Exam and/or teacher recommendation.

This course builds upon the 7th and 8th grade French curricula. Students who wish to study a WL* are encouraged to take this course upon teacher approval.

FRENCH B2

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French B1 with a minimum grade of 75% strongly recommended.

FRENCH B3

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French B2 with a minimum grade of 75% strongly recommended.

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COLLEGE FRENCH 1

Grades 11-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French B3.

COLLEGE FRENCH 2

Grade 12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of College French 1.

GERMAN B1

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Passing score on the German Checkpoint A Exam and/or teacher recommendation.

This course builds upon the 7th and 8th grade German curricula. Students who wish to study a WL* are encouraged to take this course upon teacher approval.

GERMAN B2

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of German B1 with a minimum grade of 75% strongly recommended.

GERMAN B3

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of German B2 with a minimum grade of 75% strongly recommended.

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COLLEGE GERMAN 1

Grades 11-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of German B3.

COLLEGE GERMAN 2

Grade 12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of College German 1.

SPANISH B1

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Passing score on the Spanish Checkpoint A Exam and/or teacher recommendation.

This course builds upon the 7th and 8th grade Spanish curricula. Students who wish to study a WL* are encouraged to take this course upon teacher approval.

SPANISH B2

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish B1 with a minimum grade of 75% strongly recommended.

SPANISH B3

Grades 9-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish B2 with a minimum grade of 75% strongly recommended.

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COLLEGE SPANISH 1

Grades 11-12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish B3.

COLLEGE SPANISH 2

Grade 12
1 Credit

Prerequisite: Successful completion of College Spanish 1.

Courses Qualifying for College Credit

During the fourth and fifth year of WL* study, students have the opportunity to strengthen their language skills and increase their appreciation of the culture of the countries in which the language is spoken. Movies, videos, audio recordings, magazines, newspapers and online resources provide optimum exposure to current language usage. Students read various pieces of literature from native countries to increase their understanding of the written language. Through the selection of various genres of literature and film, students gain a cultural awareness of the language and its people.

COLLEGE FRENCH 1

Grades 11-12
1 Credit

This course meets daily. Students who successfully complete the course earn one unit of school credit. The course is based on curriculum approved by Schenectady County Community College. Students who pay a fee to SCCC and successfully complete the course will receive 3 units of college credit.

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COLLEGE FRENCH 2

Grade 12
1 Credit

This course meets daily. Students who successfully complete the course earn one unit of school credit. The course is based on curriculum approved by Schenectady County Community College. Students who pay a fee to SCCC and successfully complete the course will receive 3 units of college credit.

COLLEGE GERMAN 1

Grades 11-12
1 Credit

This course meets daily. Students who successfully complete the course earn one unit of school credit. The course is based on curriculum approved by the State University of New York at Oswego. Students who pay a fee to Oswego and successfully complete the course will receive 3 units of college credit.

COLLEGE GERMAN 2

Grade 12
1 Credit

This course meets daily. Students who successfully complete the course earn one unit of school credit. The course is based on curriculum approved by the State University of New York at Oswego. Students who pay a fee to Oswego and successfully complete the course will receive 3 units of college credit.

COLLEGE SPANISH 1

Grades 11-12
1 Credit

This course meets daily. Students who successfully complete the course earn one unit of school credit. The course is based on curriculum approved by Schenectady County Community College. Students who pay a fee to SCCC and successfully complete the course will receive 3 units of college credit.

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COLLEGE SPANISH 2

Grade 12
1 Credit

This course meets daily. Students who successfully complete the course earn one unit of school credit. The course is based on curriculum approved by Schenectady County Community College. Students who pay a fee to SCCC and successfully complete the course will receive 3 units of college credit.

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CAPITAL REGION BOCES – CARRER & TECH

  • Auto Body I – Refinishing
  • Auto Body II – Collision Repair
  • Automotive Trades Technology I & II
  • AYES Sr./Auto Tech Prep
  • Building Trades I & II
  • Cosmetology I & II (mandatory summer program after completion of the first year to complete a required 120 hours of study)*
  • Criminal Justice I & II
  • Culinary Arts & Hospitality Technology I & II
  • Culinary Arts Tech Prep
  • Diesel Tech Medium/Heavy Duty Truck Repair I & II
  • Electrical Trades I & II
  • Engineering Tech
  • Global Fashion Studies I & II
  • HVAC/R (Heating, Ventilation, AC & Refrigeration) I & II
  • Internet Applications Design I & II
  • Manufacturing & Machine Tech I & II
  • Nurse Assistant
  • Sterile Processing
  • Video Gaming & Animation Design
  • Welding I & II

Special Fees Range

  • Cosmetology I – approximately $245
  • Cosmetology II – approximately $165
  • Nurse Assistant – approximately $250
  • These fees are for uniforms and kits in Cosmetology: uniforms, shoes, related equipment and licensing exam in Nurse Assistant (Fees are subject top change)

If any student is interested in enrolling in a Career and Tech program or would like more information, the guidance office has course descriptions and literature available and the Capital Region BOCES – Career and Tech Guide is located on the Scotia-Glenville High School Guidance website at the link below:

https://www.capitalregionboces.org/career-technical-education/courses-programs/

You must see your counselor to sign up for these programs.

NEW VISIONS

Making the connection between school and the workplace is the fundamental principle of the one-year New Visions programs. This honors-level program turns area businesses into “classrooms” for highly motivated, academically successful high school seniors. Students spend up to four hours per day on-site at an area business and learn about the field first-hand from trained professionals. Currently, students are able to explore the career areas of:

  • Health

Through applied academics, New visions students earn credit for honors-level English and Social Studies within the context of the field they are studying and also earn college credits. If you have an interest in any one of these career areas and would like to pursue that interest in college, see your counselor before your senior year.

Career and Technical Education

  • Career & Technical Education programs are available to all secondary school students who are passing their classes and in Grade 11 or 12 (see page 44).
  • Career & Technical graduates may receive advanced credit when furthering their education.
  • Career & Technical graduates may attend college.

Career and Technical courses are designed for those students who are interested in skilled employment upon graduation from high school, and can be very beneficial for those students who plan to attend college, technical school or join the Armed Services.

Career and Technical programs are available for interested students in grades 11 and 12. These courses are offered at the school’s Albany campus on Watervliet-Shaker Road in Colonie. Students taking a Career & Technical program spend a half-day at the campus and a half-day at Scotia-Glenville High School. Transportation is provided by the school district.

Four credits are usually awarded toward graduation each successfully completed year of the program.

Courses are offered for either one or two years with a few exceptions as indicated. A Certificate of Completion is awarded at graduation. Student may earn a Career & Technical Education-Endorsed Regents Diploma

DISTANCE LEARNING

The distance learning network is a two-way, fully interactive, full-motion video and audio system connecting specially designed classrooms in participating school districts. The network uses fiber-optic cable and telecommunications technology to enable a teacher and students in a distance learning classroom in one school to see, hear, and talk to students in comparably equipped classrooms in other schools on the network. The simultaneously interactive environment means that the teacher and all students remain in visual and verbal communication at all times during a class.

Some of the distance learning classes may take up two periods.

Available courses will vary each year.

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EQUIVALENT COURSES

These course selections must be recommended by the Committee on Special Education on a per student basis.

EQUIVALENT INSTRUCTION PROGRAM

The Equivalent Instruction Program is a special education program designed to provide the content curriculum in science, history, math and English in a differentiated format so that students with significant learning needs can obtain the credits necessary to earn a high school diploma (Local or Regents). The instruction in these classes is specially designed so that students have the opportunity to develop the critical skills and knowledge necessary to pass class and State assessments.

As 9th graders Equivalent Instruction students are offered enrollment in the Occupational Foundations course which provides learning opportunities to become ready for entry level employment. Students are provided work-based learning activities which proves for an introduction to various jobs and occupations. Students are offered the opportunity to earn the Career Development and Occupational Studies Credential as well as a high school diploma.

RESOURCE PROGRAM

The Special Education teachers in the Resource Room provide assistance and supplemental instruction to students with special education needs in all academic areas, as well as addressing specific skills such as reading, writing, mathematics, organization and social problem solving.

Resource Room classes can meet daily, but the level of participation is determined by each student’s Individual Education Plan. Participation may vary from two (2) periods per week to daily participation.

Group size is limited to five (5) students. Students do not earn credit for Resource Room classes. They are awarded report card grades of satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Participation in the Resource Room Program is determined by the committee on Special Education.

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PATHWAYS FOR ACADEMIC AND CAREER EDUCATION READINESS PROGRAM

The Pathways for Academic and Career Education Readiness Program (PACER) is a special education program which provides students with significant learning disabilities specially designed instruction in English, history, science, and math. Students who have a history of struggling to develop the content knowledge necessary to pursue a high school diploma have the opportunity to continue to develop the fundamental skills and knowledge needed to meet the New York State Learning Standards and attempt the New York State Regents Exams in math living environment, history and English.

While students in the PACER program continue to aspire to a high school diploma, most PACER students prepare to acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to qualify for a Career Development and Occupational Studies credential. PACER offers students opportunities to develop prevocational and work readiness skills that provide a foundation for post-school employment. Students enroll in the Occupational Foundations course which provides learning opportunities to become ready for entry level employment. Students are provided work-based learning activities which provide for an introduction to various jobs and occupations. As student progress through the program they are offered opportunities for community-based prevocational experiences and internships.

In addition to instructional staff, PACER offers students services from a speech/language therapist, social worker, and a job coach based on the individual needs of each student. As students near graduation, the District’s Transition Coordinator offers transition services to students and their family to prepare students to transition from high school.

Enrollment in the Pathways for Academic and Career Education Readiness Program is determined by the Committee on Special Education.

THE LIFE SKILLS PROGRAM

The Life Skills Program provides students with specially designed instruction in functional academic skills, pre-vocational and vocational skills, and social skills that provide a foundation for post school experiences. Students continue to expand their literacy and math skills while being introduced to pre-vocation and vocational experiences within the school as well as in local community businesses and organizations. Students benefit from the services of a speech therapist, social worker, adaptive physical education teacher, occupational therapist and job coach. Enrollment in the Life Skills Program is determined by the committee on Special Education. Students enrolled in the program may earn a high school credential (skills and achievement commencement credential) and are not awarded a high school diploma.

CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES

INTERSCHOLASTIC SPORTS

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