standardized test scores

 

Board of Regents approves Next Generation Learning Standards

September 11, 2017

The Board of Regents P-12 Committee today approved New York’s Next Generation Learning Standards for English Language Arts and Mathematics. The State Education Department conducted a collaborative process over two years to revise the standards, which involved numerous educators, parents and stakeholders from across the State, and resulted in substantive changes while maintaining the academic rigor of the learning standards.

Read the entire story on the NYS Education Department website - http://www.nysed.gov/news/2017/board-regents-p-12-committee-approves-next-generation-learning-standards

Here's the story in the Times Union "Goodbye Common Core" - http://www.timesunion.com/news/article/Goodbye-Common-Core-New-York-s-new-English-math-12188672.php

Scores released today for Scotia-Glenville: 2017

August 22,2017

The state Education Department today released results of the grades 3-8 state tests in English Language Arts and mathematics that students took back in April and May.

For Scotia-Glenville, compared with the 2016 scores, there were very slight increases in the number of students scoring in Levels 3 and 4 in many categories - meaning that students showed proficiency in those subjects. There were also fewer students in Levels 1 and 2, in many cases, levels indicating that a child is struggling in the subjects.

Overall, for grades 3-8 on the ELA exam, 15 percent of S-G students scored in Level 4 and 28 percent scored in Level 3 (a combined 43 percent indicating proficiency) while 34 percent of students scored in Level 2 and 23 percent scored in Level 1 (a combined 57 percent who are considered struggling). Numbers are rounded.

In 2016, 14 percent scored in Level 4 on the ELA exams and 28 percent scored in Level 3 (for a combined 42 percent) while 33 percent scored in level 2 and 25 percent scored in Level 1 (a combined 58 percent) Numbers are rounded.

Statewide, on the ELA exam, 13 percent of students scored in Level 4 and 27 percent scored in Level 3 (a combined 40 percent who are at proficiency) while 34 percent scored in Level 2 and 26 percent scored in Level 1 (a combined 60 percent who are struggling). Numbers are rounded.

On the grades 3-8 math exam, 19 percent of S-G students scored in Level 4 and 25 percent scored in Level 3 (a combined 44 percent indicating proficiency) while 31 percent of students scored in Level 2 and 25 percent scored in Level 1 (a combined 56 percent who are considered struggling). Numbers are rounded.

In 2016, 20 percent scored in Level 4 on the math exams and 28 percent scored in Level 3 (for a combined 48 percent) while 33 percent scored in level 2 and 20 percent scored in Level 1 (a combined 53 percent). Numbers are rounded.

Statewide, on the math exam, 18 percent of students scored in Level 4 and 23 percent scored in Level 3 (a combined 41 percent who are at proficiency) while 29 percent scored in Level 2 and 31 percent scored in Level 1 (a combined 60 percent who are struggling). Numbers are rounded.

Check out more about Scotia-Glenville's state test scores here - https://data.nysed.gov/profile.php?instid=800000038470

The opt-out rates continue to be high, although the state commissioner said that the 2016 and 2017 tests could be compared since they were very similar. Scotia-Glenville's ELA opt out rate was 30.4 percent and on math test it was 35 percent not taking the exam.

The state said that results across the state were little changed from the 2016 rates. Statewide, 1.9 percent more students scored in Levels 3 and 4, showing proficiency, on the ELA exam and 1.1 percent more students scored in Levels 3 and 4 on the mathematics exam.

Here's a link to the state data - https://data.nysed.gov/. Here's the state's presentation about the 2017 test scores (PDF).

Click here to check out the test results for the four elementary schools and middle school by grade.

The tests are scored using the range from a high of Level 4 to a low of Level 1:

Level 4 scores mean that students "excel in the state standards" for that grade level.

Level 3 means that students are "proficient in the state standards" for that grade level.

Level 2 scores mean that students are "not proficient in the state standards" for that grade level (partial but insufficient)

Level 1 scores mean that students are "well below proficient in the state standards" for that grade level.

 

English Language Arts results - 2017 (2016 results in parenthesis)

Grade LEVEL 1 LEVEL 2 LEVEL 3 LEVEL 4 Mean Scale Score  
3 - 147 students 18.0% (19.0%) 28.0% (29.0%) 46.0% (47.0%) 8.0% (6.0%) 317 (315)  
4 - 131 students 19.0% (21.0%) 35.0% (31.0%) 21.0% (27.0%) 24.0% (21.0%) 313 (312)  
5 - 152 students 23.0% (30.0%) 33.0% (33.0%) 28.0% (24.0%) 16.0% (13.0%) 311 (305)  
6 - 138 students 29.0% (30.0%) 42.0% (39.0%) 17.0% (19.0%) 12.0% (12.0%) 296 (295)
7 - 144 students 23.0% (35.0%) 38.0% (33.0%) 24.0% (16.0%) 16.0% (16.0%) 307 (301)
8 - 90 students 27.0% (13.0%) 30.0% (26.0%) 31.0% (39.0%) 12.0% (21.0%) 300 (316)

 

Mathematics results - 2017 (2016 results in parenthesis)

Grade LEVEL 1 LEVEL 2 LEVEL 3 LEVEL 4 Mean Scale Score  
3 - 148 students 24.0% (21.0%) 27.0% (27.0%) 30.0% (30.0%) 19.0% (23.0%) 307 (310)
4 - 133 students 24.0% (20.0%) 24.0% (31.0%) 27.0% (25.0%) 25.0% (24.0%) 307 (312)  
5 - 156 students 22.0% (19.0%) 31.0% (28.0%) 26.0% (31.0%) 22.0% (22.0%) 314 (319)  
6 - 128 students 20.0% (18.0%) 30.0% (41.0%) 20.0% (22.0%) 29.0% (19.0%) 311 (308)  
7 - 127 students 26.0% (22.0%) 35.0% (34.0%) 28.0% (30.0%) 10.0% (14.0%) 307 (312)  
8 - 68 students 38.0% (20.0%) 49.0% (41.0%) 12.0% (23.0%) 1.0% (7.0%) 290 (306)  

Results above include out of district students in grade 8.

The mean scores indicate that half of the students scored above that figure and half scored below. The maximum scores on the ELA exams vary by grade, ranging from a maximum score of 419 on the grade 6 exam to a 395 on the grade 8 exam. On the mathematics exam, the highest top scores would range from 416 on the grade 5 exam to 401 on the grade 3 exam.

New York State’s draft Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan ready for public comment; information on upcoming ESSA public hearings

May 24, 2017

The NYS Education Department is seeking public input on the draft plan to implement the federal ESSA standards and to let parents and others know about upcoming public hearings.

Check out the following links for more information:

Draft Plan: http://www.nysed.gov/news/2017/state-education-department-releases-draft-every-student-succeeds-act-plan-public-comment for information on the draft plan.

Public hearings: http://www.nysed.gov/news/2017/state-education-department-announces-13-public-meetings-be-held-receive-comment-draft for information on the public hearings. The closest public hearing is scheduled for 6 p.m. on June 15 at the QUESTAR III BOCES in Castleton.

SED staff will provide a summary and response to the comments received to the Board of Regents at its July 2017 meeting. It is expected that the board will vote on adopting a final version of the ESSA State plan in September.

For information regarding ESSA or the ESSA Public Hearings please visit: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/accountability/essa.html.

Questions regarding ESSA may be directed to Office of Accountability, at 718-722-4553, or ESSA@nysed.gov.

State asks parents to comment on the proposed new state learning standards

September 21, 2016

NYS Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia is asking parents and teachers throughout the state to comment on the proposed new standards.

"The past several years have brought a lot of changes to classrooms across New York State. I know that more changes need to be made, and I thank you for your patience," she wrote. "As teachers and parents, you know best what our children need to help them aim higher. I value your expertise and advice."

Click here to read the draft standards

Click here to comment on the draft ELA standards

Click here to comment on the draft math standards

A multi-year approach to changing the state tests

This year’s changes to the tests are part of a multi-year process that started with the Board of Regents’ Test Improvement Report in June 2015 and then solicited feedback from parents, teachers, administrators and students. The process included making recommendations as part of Governor’s Task Force and presenting the final changes to the Board of Regents in December 2015. SED implemented the changes in time for the spring 2016 exams.

While the content of the 2016 tests and last year’s tests are comparable and similarly rigorous, it is not possible to make direct comparisons of the 2016 results to prior years’ results because of changes to the tests this year. The 2016 results are valid and reliable indicators of student proficiency in the tested grades and subjects.

The standards are designed to better prepare children for the requirements of college and the work place after they graduate. The goal of the new standards is to help students better develop skills and gain exposure in the areas that matter most in the world that awaits them after graduation. The result is that students are being asked to learn new skills, concepts and different ways of approaching questions and solving problems. The new standards are reflected in an updated curriculum in the schools and are now reflected on state exams.

 

 

ImageState plans changes to the standardized exams in English Language Arts and  mathematics that students will take in April

March 4, 2016

Students in grades 3-8 will be taking the 2016 exams in English Language Arts and mathematics on April 5-7 and April 13-15, respectively.

The state has announced several changes: greater involvement of educators in the test development process; exams will have fewer questions; students will be given as much time as they need to complete the tests; moratorium on the use of grades 3-8 ELA/math test scores in teacher and principal evaluations; release of more test questions; and a new testing vendor.

Click on the image at left to learn more about the state changes.

Advanced Placement exams allow students to earn college credit while in high school

February 25, 2016

This is the time of year that students are planning their middle school and high school schedules for the upcoming school year. Here is information about the Advanced Placement (AP) offerings (administered through the College Board) at Scotia-Glenville, beginning with the September 2016 semester:

Scotia-Glenville High School is committed to offering a wide array of AP Courses taught by well-trained teachers, based on the belief that participating in challenging high school courses is the best way for students to prepare for success in college and career. Read more HERE

Students can take many paths in middle school and high school at Scotia-Glenville

February 25, 2016

Gone are the days when all students take the same classes at middle school and high school.

Today, there are opportunities for advancement along the way, a way to challenge students to reach their level of excellence. For example, Scotia-Glenville offers several Advanced Placement (AP) opportunities.

Check out the various paths students can take in the four main subject areas: English Language Arts, mathematics, science and social studies. Read more HERE

 

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Response to Intervention (RTI)

Response to Intervention (RTI) is a process used in schools to provide well-designed instruction, closely monitor all students' progress and provide additional instructional supports to students who are not meeting grade level expectations. Read more here (PDF).

 

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Higher standards will boost college and career readiness

The bottom line is that while we all put importance on a given year’s test results, the larger purpose of education is making sure that students have the skills, knowledge, and experiences they need to be successful in life. We continue to be committed to this goal and to preparing our students for the increasingly competitive world.

State officials emphasize that fact: these new standards will ultimately strengthen instructional programs and that the 2013 exams will serve as a baseline of student performance for us to build upon in future years.

Here is an overview of the testing program and anticipated results from the New York State Board of Regents' July meeting - http://www.regents.nysed.gov/meetings/2013Meetings/July2013/StandardSetting.pdf

“Every time a college freshman takes a placement exam that first month on campus, he or she is being tested against the very expectations in the Common Core," wrote NYS Education Commissioner John King.

"Every time a high school graduate faces a daunting task on a challenging job (from the welder applying knowledge of fractions to the electrician reading the National Electrical Code), he or she is being tested against the Common Core. And quite frankly, our students are not doing well enough on those real world tests. Only about 35 percent of our students graduate with the skills and knowledge necessary to be called college- and career-ready.”

Educators across New York are watching the results carefully because the standardized student scores and growth in student improvement from one year to the next will become a component (at least 20%) of their annual state-mandated principal and teacher evaluations (APPR) in the future.

Many felt the implementation of the Common Core standards was rushed in New York. They argued that teachers did not have adequate time to prepare new curriculums and class lessons and that students' knowledge bases should have been incrementally built over a period of time.

Despite the change in standardized testing, the state Education Department has taken care to ensure the testing process is done as fairly as possible and to ensure that students and educators will not be adversely affected by changes in the design of state tests. The state-provided growth scores for teachers and principals (to be distributed later this fall) will be based on year-to-year scale score comparisons of similar students, all of whom experienced the new state tests for the first time at the same time in 2012-13.

Hence, the teacher/principal growth scores will result in similar proportions of educators in each of the four HEDI categories (highly effective, effective, developing, and ineffective) in 2012-13 compared to 2011-12.

As always, feel free to contact your child’s teacher or principal if you have questions about the state exams or the new standards. In addition, please visit http://engageny.org/parent-and-family-resources for a variety of materials relating to the Common Core Learning Standards.

 

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New York State Regents exams

Scotia-Glenville results


Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) I

Mean Scores Critical reading Mathematics
Scotia-Glenville  509  527
New York State  485  499
United States  497  514

Scotia-Glenville High School Profile (PDF) - information about the most recent graduating class that is used when transcripts are sent to colleges this year.

 

Graduation information

Here is graduation and post-graduation information from the most recent class.


Advanced Placement exams allow students to earn college credit while in high school

This is the time of year that students are planning their middle school and high school schedules for the upcoming school year. Here is information about the Advanced Placement (AP) offerings (administered through the College Board) at Scotia-Glenville, beginning with the September 2016 semester:

Scotia-Glenville High School is committed to offering a wide array of AP Courses taught by well-trained teachers, based on the belief that participating in challenging high school courses is the best way for students to prepare for success in college and career. Read more HERE

Learn more about Advanced Placement and SUPA course offerings at Scotia-Glenville

February 2, 2017

A parent program was held this evening to explain the 12 Advanced Placement (AP) and two Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) course offerings at Scotia-Glenville beginning this fall.

Here is the AP/SUPA presentation (PDF).

 

 

Students can take many paths in middle school and high school at Scotia-Glenville

Gone are the days when all students take the same classes at middle school and high school.

Today, there are opportunities for advancement along the way, a way to challenge students to reach their level of excellence. For example, Scotia-Glenville offers several Advanced Placement (AP) opportunities.

Check out the various paths students can take in the four main subject areas: English Language Arts, mathematics, science and social studies. Read more HERE

 

Advanced Placement Courses Offered

  • Chemistry

  • Biology

  • Calculus AB

  • Calculus BC

  • Economics

  • English Literature & Composition

  • English Language & Composition

  • Physics Psychology

  • Statistics

  • US History

  • World History

 

Number of students taking AP courses: 131

Percent scoring a 3 or higher on Advanced Placement (AP) final exams
Advanced Placement (AP) students earn college credit by enrolling in certain courses in high school. The credit is accepted by many colleges.

Last year, 121 Scotia-Glenville students were enrolled in AP courses and took 197 AP exams (some students enroll in more than one AP course). Of the 121 students, 99 of them (82%) received college credit. Students must receive a 3 or higher to receive the college and school credit. Students who receive a score or 2 or 1 receive school credit only. Figures below show the percentage receiving a score of 3 or higher on the exams offered:

Biology: 71.4%
Calculus AB: 30%
Calculus BC: 85.7%
Chemistry: 73.1%
Micro
Economics: 81.2%
English Literature and composition: 72.7%
Psychology: 65%
US Government and Politics: 100.0%
US History: 80.8%
World History: 62.1%

 

Percent receiving college credit through the University in the High School (UHS) program in 2012.
University in the High School (UHS) students earn State University of New York college credit by enrolling in the following courses though Schenectady County Community College.
In 2012, 388 Scotia-Glenville students were enrolled in UHS courses and 340 of them (87.6%) received college credit. Students must maintain a C average in the course to receive the college credit. Figures below show the percentage of students who received UHS college credit for those courses:

Schenectady County CC
Business Law: 84.5%
CISCO IT Essentials (fall): 91.3%
CISCO IT Essentials (spring): 100.0%
CISCO CCNA Discovery Program: 88.9%
Intro to Computers
: 93.8%
Entrepreneurship: 73.3%
College French 4: 70.6%
College French 5: 100.0%
College Spanish 4: 80.6%
College Spanish 5: 100.0%

Introduction to Drawing: 100%
Math 12 (Pre-Calc): 87.5%
Statistics (fall): 62.5%
Statistics (spring): 100.0%

 

University in the High School (UHS) students earn State University of New York college credit by enrolling in the following course though SUNY Cobleskill. Figures below show the percentage of students who received UHS college credit for the course:

Child Growth/Development: 100%

 

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